zero waste

(Orange County Archives/Wikimedia)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
In 1957, Monsanto’s House of the Future predicted what living in 1986 might be like. Made almost entirely of fiberglass and plastic, where is the house now?

Here is just some of the garbage that I accumulated in a week of trying to be very conscious of my waste. A food wrapper, Q-tips, medication packet, and some old tissue paper. These items are used almost daily for many people. They are all disposable and items that didn’t necessarily first come to mind when I would think of everyday “waste.”

Eckerd College
As we look at climate change it can seem overwhelming, but the impactful and eye-opening action of limiting waste can create an amazing and hopeful future that everyday people can be apart of.
recycling conveyer belts

Recycling flows through Waste Management's CID Recycling & Disposal operation on Chicago's far southeast side in this 2015 image. (Chris Bentley/Creative Commons)

SUNY College at Brockport
Recycling used to be thought of as the answer to our waste problems. But rising recycling issues mean the U.S. has to change its strategies toward waste, reports a new survey from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group.
Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
Composting is one of the most attainable steps for people on the path to a more sustainable lifestyle, but many find the process intimidating. This inspiring podcast breaks down composting for you.
Eckerd College
Single-use items are designed to be used for minutes and will still be on the planet for hundreds of years to come. This art installation and video about the project aim to draw attention to "The Plastic Problem."
Dumpsters

Three large Dumpsters sit outside of University of Mississippi residence hall. (Bryce Johnson/University of Mississippi)

University of Mississippi
Many campuses across America are striving to achieve zero waste during move out.

(Christopher Porter/Flickr)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
As the population grows we are constantly asked the question of, how to manage our waste?

Do you really need that decoration in your drink? Or the straw, for that matter? It's OK to pass on these extras. (Alpha du centaure/Creative Commons)

GWU
I've found not many college students know the basics of living more sustainably and cheaply. Here are a few ideas students can use to change up their daily routine to be more gentle to our earth.