wildlife conservation

A woman in a white shirt is surrounded by wildlife rangers wearing green jumpsuits. The group holds a large white picture frame with text that reads, "I conquered the Wildlife Ranger Challenge. #ForWildlifeRangers," and five logos of supporting organizations fill the bottom of the frame.

Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo, in white, poses for a photograph at the Wildlife Ranger Challenge, a project to both raise funds and awareness of the struggles facing wildlife rangers across Africa. (Photo courtesy Taku Mutezo)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo has a solution to Zimbabwe's human-wildlife conflict that uses natural and local resources, and benefits the community as well.
Asian elephant in an enclosure at the National Zoo.

An Asian elephant stands near the fence of its enclosure at the National Zoo in Washington DC. Asian elephants are the closest living relatives of wooly mammoths. Photo from 5/8/2019. (Skylar Epstein/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
One biotech startup claims it can use Asian elephants to breed “functional mammoths” that help fight climate change. The prospect of bringing genetic engineering technologies into the world of conservation raises complex moral questions.