Waste

Four shots of a model in a black and white colored tunic
George Washington University
Through fashion, Brazilian designer Daniel Davilla detects the intrinsic beauty of “junk” and molds it into a garment that appeals to all audiences.
The George Washington University
As the awareness of the perniciousness of plastic grows, companies and universities are implementing initiatives to go plastic free. GW was the first university in Washington, D.C., to do so.
SUNY ESF
Since the beginning of the pandemic in 2020 face masks have become a part of our everyday lives — and yet another thing polluting the planet. What can be done?
A white bird rests next to a colorful ball of red and blue plastic waste.

Visible plastic waste (A_Different_Perspective/Pixabay)

George Washington University
The George Washington University issued a ban on single-use plastics at university events, however, it failed to address the microplastics pollution that comes from its merchandise.

This is a mask laying in the snow covered in ice, dirt and more almost blending in with their surroundings. (Louisa Reitzel/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
The pandemic has yet another side effect that we tend to overlook: disposable masks litter the ground and pollute the world around us.
A person in a white shirt, head not pictured, holds a yellow water bottle with several colorful, overlapping stickers.

Paige Valego, GW class of 2021. (Greer Blount/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
So Long, Single-Use? | As George Washington University students returned to campus in the fall of 2021, they took ownership of the university's single-use plastics ban through the personalization of reusable water bottles.
A person with short hair in a life jacket pulls a white plastic bucket out of a body of water while kneeling in a boat.

Eckerd student samples water near Skyway after the Piney Point spill that occurred earlier this year (Shannon Gowans/Eckerd College).

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
In March 2021, a leak was discovered at the Piney Point phosphate mine and fertilizer plant in Florida. Researcher Shannon Gowans said the following red tide was "one of the most severe" she has seen.

Food scraps are turned into methane and other gases that are captured and turned into fuel in UC Davis' Renewable Energy Anaerobic Biodigester. (KQED Quest/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
There are only two days left at COP26, and while much progress has been made, there's still more to do. Today learn about how reducing methane could change our climate's course, and explore packaging challenges.
George Washington University
Disposable period care products can have a huge environmental impact. Here are five brands selling sustainable alternatives to reduce the waste from periods around the world.
Syracuse University
Thrifting is not only great for the environment, but amazing for the human soul.

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