Technology

Image shows diver holding camera swimming in the ocean, looking ahead.

This is an early prototype of the camera. Research divers will be able to use GPS to create accurate maps that can be compared point-by-point over time. (Illustration courtesy of Richard Vevers/The Ocean Agency)

University of Rhode Island
Inspired by 360-degree cameras utilized by Google Street view, the Ocean Agency developed the Hammerhead Camera, a similar camera designed to be used in an underwater environment, according to Richard Vevers, Ocean Agency founder and CEO.
Woman in a black shirt smiles at the camera while holding out an iPhone and standing in front a large monitor showing a page titled "EpiCollect RoadkillGarneau" with a map of the continental U.S. and several charts.

Dr. Garneau presenting research on her RoadkillGarneau project back in 2012. (Gerianne Downs/SUNY-Plattsburgh)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
Dr. Danielle Garneau, wildlife ecologist, is an attentive driver. The serpentine roads of upstate New York, which she drives along daily, are trafficked with possible hazards –– but what she's really scouting for is roadkill. 
Planet Forward Correspondent | Arizona State University
According to N-Drip’s Chief Sustainability Officer, Seth Siegel, their technology brings a new irrigation system that could help save 50% of the water used in Arizona’s agriculture.
George Washington University
Marine scientists are using information collected by everyday people to monitor sharks in the face of climate change.
Northwestern University
Emily Little and Marisa Sloan report on the work Fermilab is doing, exploring quantum computing as a means of sustainability research.

How are college students handling the transition to all e-learning? Six students at SUNY Plattsburgh provided an update.

SUNY Plattsburgh
SUNY Plattsburgh professor Curt Gervich interviewed six environmental science and studies students to find out how they are adapting to college life in the time of COVID-19 — and what we can learn from their experiences.

(Photo by Cate Twining-Ward)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent
Here are five easy, innovative, and free ways that students can reduce their impact on the environment right now, by using the technology that is at their fingertips.
The George Washington University
Through the GW Innovation Center, nine GW students are partnering with the Jane Goodall Institute to create the Virtual Jane Project, showcasing Goodall's life and empowering others to use technology for social good.

Mario Arvelo, Committee on World Food Security Chair, speaks at the introductory session to kick off day one of CFS 46. (Dan Reed/PlanetForward.org)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
The cool thing about traveling with people you don’t know is the opportunity to figure out who you really are, or at least who you want to be. You can realign with your beliefs and opinions about whatever is going on in the world.

The First Lady of Colombia, María Juliana Ruiz Sandoval (third from left), and director of nutrition at the World Food Programme, Lauren Landis (second from the right), are panelists for the session "Innovation and Agroecology: A Path to Sustainability" at CFS 46. (Kim Ossi/PlanetForward.org)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Mississippi
Technology has touched every sector and aspect of humankind and the food sector is no different. The digital invasion in the agricultural industry is underway. However, these “intruders” are bringing positive changes.

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