sustainable agriculture

Planet Forward
In late summer 2018, 11 students from 11 different universities traveled with Planet Forward to Woodland, California, for a storytelling expedition about food waste reduction.

A tractor sits idle on Eric Schreiner's family farm. Schreiner Farms grows tomatoes for The Morning Star Company, which produces products for companies like Campbell's and Heinz. (Brigit Kenney/Eckerd College)

Eckerd College
In the next story in our Tackling Food Waste series, Eckerd College student Brigit Kenney looks at the broad connection between food production to actually getting that food on our plates. It's a much larger process than she expected to see.
Farmer in a tractor
Texas Tech University
Taking a look into making sustainable agriculture practices in California's Central Valley, it's obvious that farmers and seed suppliers have their work cut out for them.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
In Episode 3 of NET’s “On the Table,” NPR’s Dan Charles introduces us to a group of farmers with their noses in the dirt and explains why food companies could soon start labeling their products as soil friendly.
Frank Sesno & Chris Policinski at the 2018 Planet Forward Summit
Land O'Lakes, Inc.
Farmers genuinely care about doing their part to protect our planet, for all the same reasons as anyone else. While it’s a worthy sentiment, I believe it’s time to update our message to reflect the changing reality of our industry.
Carbon footprint of meals

A protein dense, carbon friendly lunch. (Photo by Katherine Baker)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
A comparison between 5 meals shows that carbon emissions per calorie varies greatly for certain types of food. Not surprisingly, meat recipes hold the highest carbon-to-calorie ratio.
University of Wisconsin - Madison
In episode five, students discuss sustainable agriculture and how the food we eat impacts the environment. 

Personal Food Computer (PFC) v2.0 alpha (2016). (Photo courtesy of Open Agriculture Initiative, MIT Media Lab)

SUNY ESF
MIT’s Open Agriculture Initiative is drawing on the very societal changes that have distanced average citizens from traditional agriculture to close the gap in knowledge and control what we eat.
Kansas State University
A lecture covering global food production emphasizes the importance of intensification for sustainable agriculture around the world.

Dr. Stephen Carmody founded the Native Cultigen Project at Sewanee: The University of the South. (Photo courtesy Stephen Carmody)

Sewanee: University of the South
By understanding agricultural practices of those indigenous to this region, the Native Cultigen Project may be able to ignite a new wave of sustainable agriculture – one that looks to the past for solutions for the future.

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