sustainable agriculture

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
As we aim toward sustainable, more accessible agricultural practices, community supported agriculture (CSA) continues to grow. This fictional story offers insight to the beginning of the movement.

An open-air market in Jodhpur, Rajasthan, features mounds of fresh vegetables and fruits. (Matthew Laird Acred/Flickr)

University of Mississippi
Mississippi is a contradiction of limited local food access in a state with deep agricultural roots. How can we solve this uniquely American problem, and what can we learn from other countries?
University of Wisconsin Madison
Industrial agriculture is a huge contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and now, more than ever, people are exploring alternative food cultivation systems such as hydroponics to offset the damage done by industrial agriculture.

(Nate Mach/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin - Madison
A Madison, Wisconsin-based dream of a hydroponics-driven future: How one student organization hopes to inspire others to embrace clean, sustainable urban agriculture.

John Purcell, head of Vegetables R&D for Bayer, was leading the conversation on plant breeding on a tour of Bayer's research facility in Woodland, Calif., in August. (Planet Forward)

Stevenson University
Next in our series: Stevenson University's Quinn Luethy looks deeper into how we're going to feed our planet's growing population. Solutions include the development of crops that can withstand the challenges of climate change.

(Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
Next in our Tackling Food Waste series: Any food discussion inevitably involves GMOs. Columbia University's Katherine Baker spoke with an organic farmer and plant pathologist/geneticist to find out more.
Planet Forward
In late summer 2018, 11 students from 11 different universities traveled with Planet Forward to Woodland, California, for a storytelling expedition about food waste reduction.

A tractor sits idle on Eric Schreiner's family farm. Schreiner Farms grows tomatoes for The Morning Star Company, which produces products for companies like Campbell's and Heinz. (Brigit Kenney/Eckerd College)

Eckerd College
In the next story in our Tackling Food Waste series, Eckerd College student Brigit Kenney looks at the broad connection between food production to actually getting that food on our plates. It's a much larger process than she expected to see.
Farmer in a tractor
Texas Tech University
Taking a look into making sustainable agriculture practices in California's Central Valley, it's obvious that farmers and seed suppliers have their work cut out for them.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
In Episode 3 of NET’s “On the Table,” NPR’s Dan Charles introduces us to a group of farmers with their noses in the dirt and explains why food companies could soon start labeling their products as soil friendly.

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