sustainability

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Plattsburgh
Marine group works with ports to provide cleaner air and waterways through voluntary environmental certification program, offering economic and community benefits.
View from shore of ocean and sky

The new California law will protect the plethora of life beneath the ocean's surface. (Emily Vidovich/George Washington University)

George Washington University
By no longer allowing California's swordfish fishery to use driftnets, the state has prioritized the creation of an environmentally sound industry and stood up against outdated, harmful practices.

March Point refineries above Anacortes, Wash., with Fidalgo and Padilla Bay views. (Dana/Creative Commons)

George Washington University
A look at the implications of the UN’s new climate change research and what you can do about it.
Alaska sunset

A sunset photo from on board the National Geographic Sea Lion, during my recent life-changing trip to Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
Next in our Alaska series: While many still find climate change up for debate, perhaps the way to engage and persuade these individuals is by focusing on its effects in their own communities rather than in far away places.
National Geographic Sea Lion off the coast of Alaska
Planet Forward
Our Planet Forward Storyfest 2018 grand prize winners traveled this June on Alaska Airlines to Sitka. Their destination? The Lindblad Expeditions' National Geographic Sea Lion for an 8-day exploration of the incredible ecosystems along the coastal... Read More
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
There's a lot to love about Trader Joe's, including their impressive food donation program, which benefits local communities of each and every store.
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Cartí Sugtupu island

The bustling island of Cartí Sugtupu serves as a hub for the Gunas living in the Comarca. Cartí Sugtupu includes a solar-powered school, as well as a hostel and supermarket, among its amenities. (Abigail Foerstner/Medill)

Northwestern University
As Panama's indigenous Guna islands begin sinking into the surrounding waters, local entrepreneurs with successful eco-friendly businesses could prove the revolutionary power of small-scale innovation, Medill's Molly Glick reports.
local transportation is via boat

Traveling on boats is the main mode of transportation between islands of Guna Yala, and most are operated by local Guna people. (Luodan Rojas/Medill)

Northwestern University
Separated by miles of ocean and a 2-hour drive, or a 50-mile hike, through the jungle, Guna Yala and Kalu Yala are two of Panama’s most sustainable communities, but they also are starkly different. Medill's Luodan Rojas reports.

The starting point of the hiking trip was at Kalu Yala - a sustainable community in the
Panamanian jungle. (Grace Wade/Medill)

Northwestern University
Fifty miles over four days. Seven hikers left Kalu Yala, a sustainable eco-town in the Panamanian jungle, to trek to the Caribbean Sea and quickly discovered an untested trail and faced other challenges head-on. Medill's Nadine Daher ​reports.

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