science

This innovative procedure is able, to transform ordinary faucet water into an exceptionally forceful sanitizing cleanser used in advanced hospital surgical rooms, emulsifying oils/de-greaser and neutral cleanser, merely by running a little... Read More
College campuses are energy guzzlers. I know because I just graduated from Indiana University. As an environmental enthusiast that is worried about the future of our planet, I don't know of a quicker, cheaper or more convenient way to avoid wasted... Read More
This weekend, the quadrennial global spectacle that is the Olympics kicks off in London.  The athletes are no doubt champions in their own right, but so are the Olympic planners and developers who say these Games will be the greenest ones yet.  In... Read More
If you live on the East Coast, you are undoubtedly riding out a heat wave right now.  If you're not, consider yourself lucky!  This week we feature innovators who are coming up with new and creative ways to both reduce the negative impacts of heat... Read More
This week we feature Planet Forward innovators who are working to make our energy grid more efficient, modern, and sustainable.  Believe it or not, many aspects of our energy grid are based off of models created 100 years ago.  Can you imagine if... Read More
National Science Foundation
Researchers at Michigan Technical University (MTU) have created a combustion vessel to study engine technologies operating on an expanding set of alternative fuels with reduced emissions and increased efficiency. This work will help to increase... Read More
National Geographic and Planet Forward
By Raymond Orbach
National Science Foundation
Climate CoLab--a new online forum developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology--brings large numbers of citizens together to develop creative solutions to complex problems such as climate change. The Climate CoLab allows... Read More
National Science Foundation
Geologists drilling an exploratory geothermal well in 2009 in the Krafla volcano in Iceland met with a big surprise: underground lava, also called magma, flowed into the well at 2.1 kilometers (6,900 feet) depth. It forced the scientists to stop... Read More

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