science communication

An adult humpback whale and a juvenile swim underwater as rays of sunlight streak through the ocean.

(Swanson Chan/Unsplash License)

University of Connecticut
Human-generated sound pollution is harming the way aquatic animals communicate. Here's how several scientists are communicating this issue to the public.
A sign with a picture of a "tarpon tag" license plate. The text underneath states, "This project was funded by a grant from Tampa Bay Estuary Program's Specialty License Plate"

An example of the "tarpon tag" license plate. For $17 a year, Florida residents can have this specialty license plate which funds dozens of community projects every year. (Carter Weinhofer/Eckerd College)

Planet Forward Sr. Correspondent | Eckerd College
What effect can a cool license plate have on your local ecosystem? In the Tampa Bay area, simply purchasing a specialty license plate, adorned in the iconic tarpon, funds dozens of projects annually through the Tampa Bay Estuary Program.

An ancient old-growth redwood forest along California's northern coast. Changes to forestation on the West Coast may have downstream effects on temperatures and precipitation in the Mississippi River Basin. (Halley Hughes)

Planet Forward Sr. Correspondent | University of Arizona
In this podcast, I chat with Jose Soto, Ph.D. about his work in Ecoclimate Teleconnections and the importance of communicating complex scientific ideas to a wider audience. 
A feral hog searches for food among some rocks.

Feral hogs are a destructive invasive species prevalent across Texas. (Roy Buri/Pixabay)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Texas Tech University
Controlling invasive species can be costly and time-consuming. Watch this video to learn how including them on your plate could be a viable way to manage and even reduce populations.
Photo of eight people on a stage in front of a blue background.

From left: Planet Forward Founding Director Frank Sesno; Leo, Operations Coordinator at Plantita Power; Jennifer Cuyuch, George Washington University, whose story covered Plantita Power; Halley Hughes, University of Arizona; Sven Lindblad; Farzona Comnas, George Washington University; Ryan Bieber, Ithaca College; and Dr. Imani M. Cheers, GW's Director of Academic Adventures. (Not pictured is Delaney Graham, SUNY-ESF.)

Founding Director, Planet Forward
We are pleased to announce the winners of our annual Storyfest competition – the very best stories from college students around the environment, sustainability, and innovative solutions from the past academic year.

Pictured (left to right): Berkana McDowell, Eva Stanton, Alexis Hernandez, Maya Cheav, Ben Jensen, Ruby Baldwin-Smith, Veronica Warner, Max Burrous, Kate Hartshorn, Holland Hatch, Christian Grevin, Hannah Waldorf, Amy Asmussen, Kelly Ly, Hilary Lee, Dr. Richelle Tanner, Koa Tanner. (Photo by Chapman University)

Chapman University
When 25,000 gallons of oil spilled along Huntington Beach, Calif., in early October 2021, damaging valuable, intertidal ecosystems and threatening public health, environmental advocacy students saw an opportunity to make a difference.

For this segment of "Experts on Camera," the third I worked on, I did everything from deciding on a topic to editing the videos together. (Screenshot courtesy of SciLine/ https://www.sciline.org/wildfires/smoke-childrens-health/)

George Washington University
From day one I knew this was the field I wanted to be in––I left wanting to find a science communications job more than anything.
Two red foxes look at the camera from where they rest on a concrete parking lot.

From my article, "Studies debunk ‘nature is healing’ narrative from 2020 lockdowns" (Photo by Rural Explorer courtesy of Unsplash / https://unsplash.com/license).

George Washington University
To me, this internship experience meant a place to grow and refine my scientific reporting skills. Being encouraged to explore a topic in ways I find newsworthy was quite liberating.
Founding Director, Planet Forward
Our 2021 Summit event hosted some of the most compelling guests — and conversations — we've ever had. Whether you want to re-watch a portion, or check out the entire event, we have all the info here.

EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan, right, vowed to “reinject science” into federal climate policy in a conversation with Planet Forward Founder Frank Sesno, left, at the 2021 Planet Forward Summit.

Founding Director, Planet Forward
The Planet Forward Summit drew students and experts from across the country, and around the world, to consider actions needed to address and communicate climate change.

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