science

People circle around round, white tables on a green floor beneath an illuminate globe which represents the Earth.

The action zone and globe at COP26 in Glasgow. (COP26/Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
In the aftermath of COP26, PF Correspondent Lily John sat down with social-ecological systems and ecological economics researcher Dr. Valerie Luzadis, who attended the summit virtually.
Four people stand in front of blue walls with the UN Climate Change Conference 2021 logo.

From right to left: Moderator Shardul Tiwari and YEAH Fellows Alexis Pascaris, Jacob Genuise and Amanda Pastore. (Dr. Gillian Bowser/Colorado State University)

University of Connecticut
Despite the power of big oil money, corrupt politicians, and current climate trends, there is something that gives me a surge of optimism and energy: younger generations.
Glasgow university, with a distinctive central spire, is seen from the air, with a cluster of trees turning autumnal colors in the foreground

As researchers, we're focused on how to connect our university to our local communities. How might Glasgow University, shown here, connect with the community around it? (Ian Dick/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

Research Director for Sustainable GW | George Washington University
The Road to COP26 | As student and faculty representatives at COP26, GW senior Jane Barkholz and Dr. Robert Orttung aim to connect the university to the broader community taking action to address climate change.

(Jon Tyson/Unsplash)

Executive Director, Global Council for Science and the Environment
The Road to COP26 | The head of the Global Council for Science and the Environment is going to COP26 to ensure that science is included in "deliberations, negotiations, and decisions that are rigorous and durable."

(Image by Arielle Bader)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
As the COVID-19 pandemic soared around the world, people turned to science for answers. Science communicators were on the front lines of understanding the virus, reporting trustworthy science and battling the spread of misinformation. 
gold mine water pollution

Ecosystem destruction, such as this pollution from a gold mine, is a primary driver of zoonotic disease reproduction and transmission. Natural ecosystems act as a buffer zone, preventing spillover of certain pathogens from animals to people.

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Cornell University
While much about the future remains uncertain, we do know this is not the last pandemic we'll face. And if we want to prevent future pandemics, we need to focus on the impact of humans on our environment.

A science classroom in Evanston Township High School where Marla Isaacs, a biology teacher, encourages respectful conversations when teaching about climate change, no matter what their opinion is. (Natalie Chun/Northwestern University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
“It's just a statement,” teacher Anna Kraftson said of climate change. “There's data. It's not like ‘I believe in this’ or ‘I don't believe in this.’"
SUNY ESF
Without the field, science communication, science would cease to exist the second a scientist left the laboratory. If the found data cannot be synthesized in a manner that people can understand, what is the point of doing the research? 
SUNY-ESF
This podcast explores our food consciousness by introducing small, mental changes to cherish the food in our lives through the use of science and poetry.

Anand Varma spoke at the 2018 Planet Forward Summit about his parasite project. He said he tried to approach something most people would shy away from and make it interesting enough that the audience will investigate and learn. (Adam Mason for Planet Forward)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
National Geographic Explorer and science photographer Anand Varma has a unique approach when crafting a story that involves complex science subjects, always with the audience's interests in mind.

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