rising sea levels

A warmly lit white building over a city street at night.

(Yuting Wu/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | When I was little, my grandma told me that the city’s name “Shanghai” was derived from its location. In Chinese, it means “above the sea.” Will it be much longer?
New York City sinking
New York City sinking
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
My story is about my journey with painting and how New York City played a role in my perception of climate change.
Alaska mountain landscape with glacier in foreground

We will need innovative thinking to keep beautiful glaciers like this one around. (Ashley Gallagher/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
A team of engineers have big plans to prevent the collapse of the world's ice sheets — and it could be the largest civil engineering project ever attempted.
Northwestern University
Abelardo “Tito” Nuñez Davies first came to Pelican Island 15 years ago. It was much larger then. The small hut he and his mother share started out in the middle of this tiny oasis of sand. Now, the ocean laps at their doorstep. 
Northwestern University
The indigenous Guna people of Panama prepare to leave the islands they call home due to rising sea levels, while entrepreneur Jimmy Stice builds a sustainable town in the jungle of Panama. Elizabeth Guthrie of Medill reports.
The George Washington University
Rising sea levels call for innovative ways to protect cities from extreme flooding.
Storm surge

Storm surges during Hurricane Sandy. (Master Sgt. Mark Olsen/Flickr)

Rutgers University—New Brunswick
As coastal and inland communities alike grapple with the implications of costlier floods and a lack of flood-proof infrastructure, governments have increasingly turned to purchasing and vacating flood-prone properties.
The George Washington University
Rising temperatures mean more trouble for Florida's economy and coastline. 
The George Washington University
What if your favorite place was in the way of a serious flood? What if climate change meant it would keep happening, over and over?
Video by Chloe Sorvino and Cory Weinberg
Video by Chloe Sorvino and Cory Weinberg
Seas are projected to rise up to six feet this century, and Florida is right in the path of destruction. One student takes a personal look at what's being done right now.

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