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A man in a long shirt and pants hold a long pole out over a section of crops in a large field. The pole is spraying a mist over the plants.

A worker sprays a field with pesticide. (phhere.com/Public Domain)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Bartlett Durand of the Sand County Foundation discusses the effects of fertilizer use on waterways and what farmers can do to combat these effects.

Pathoumma Meusch stands before a small herd of cattle after checking on her goats. Meusch Farms LLC produces grass-fed cattle with little environmental impact, she said. (Photo by: Lauren Ulrich, Indiana University Bloomington)

Indiana University
Pathoumma Meusch doesn’t consider herself revolutionary. “I’m just a farmer,” as she says. But the unassuming woman has championed local food in a region dominated by industrial agriculture and redefined what it means to be a Midwestern farmer.

Tamia Parsons, 19, Sunrise Movement Coordinator for the Central New York Hub. (Lindsay Eberhart/SUNY-ESF)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
One week after the climate strike, I sat down with 19-year-old Tamia Parsons, a sophomore at Syracuse University and one of the leaders of the environmental movement in Central New York.