politics

(Caroline Tanner/Medill)

Northwestern University
A Capitol Hill hearing called to discuss the use of technology to address climate change quickly veered into a long debate about how much human activity has contributed to the country’s warming temperature. 
Syracuse University
Can changing the way we think about our planet help us fight back against the erosion of our most treasured natural areas?

Maya van Rossum, shown here at an event in 2014, recently released a new book called “Green Amendment: Securing Our Right to a Healthy Environment.” (Chesapeake Climate/Creative Commons)

State University College at Buffalo
Maya van Rossum has been the leader of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network since 1994. Planet Forward sat down with her to discuss her new book, “Green Amendment.”
Wil Burns

Wil Burns speaks at the Negative Emissions Workshop at George Washington University. (Marija Stefanovic/GWU)

State University College at Buffalo
Wil Burns is an expert in the field of environmental policy, with a research focus of climate geoengineering governance. Planet Forward sat down with Burns to discuss the Paris Climate Agreement and other climate change policies.
Political third-party logos

A sampling of political third party logos: Green Party (top left), Constitution Party (center left), Patriot Party (center right), Pirate Party (top right), Socialist Party (bottom left), Libertarian Party (center left), New Whig Party (center right), and Justice Party (bottom right). (Democracy Chronicles/Creative Commons)

Towson University
The 2016 Presidential Election had more than 6.9 million Americans voting for a third party. As registered independents increase, what do these third parties look like, and what are their views on the environment? 
George Washington University
In the past few months, Democratic Attorneys General have emerged at the forefront of the anti-Trump resistance, making waves by racking up legal victories against the two travel ban executive orders.

Dr. Rhett Larson (right) is working to bring sustainable water solutions to the Middle East. (Ashley St. Thomas/ASU Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives)

Arizona State University
An ASU initiative is identifying communities that host large refugee populations and developing ways to make sure they have enough water capacity to assist with their swelling populations.
Naomi Oreskes

Naomi Oreskes addresses scientists at the annual AAAS Conference in Boston. (Janice Cantieri/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
Harvard historian Naomi Oreskes urged hundreds of scientists to step beyond the objectivity of their data and embrace the riskier role as “sentinels” for scientific facts.
Joshua Jackson climate extremes ecological threat

Joshua Jackson, researcher at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, explained that heightened ecological threats like drought or famine could lead to more intolerant societies with stricter cultural norms. (Janice Cantieri/Medill)

Northwestern University
Rising extremes of droughts, floods or food shortages can reduce a country’s political stability and cultural tolerance, warned scientists at the American Association for the Advancements of Science conference in Boston.
University of Wisconsin - Madison
In this episode of Sciencecast: Climate Change Series, Dr. Sharon Dunwoody, professor emerita in the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, discusses science communication and journalism.

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