plastic

We Tried Living Without Plastics For a Day
We Tried Living Without Plastics For a Day
George Washington University
Plastic is everywhere, but can you avoid it? Watch two college students try by tracking their plastic use and making plastic-free adjustments.
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
The conversation around plastic today is commonly focused on plastic straws and the harm they do to marine life. But we need to look at the bigger picture.
George Washington University
We are seeing water bottle filling stations systems pop up across public spaces, and especially on college campuses. Increasing these stations across the country can help clean up our oceans.
The George Washington University
Why do we need to buy a cucumber that is wrapped in cling wrap, when it is already wrapped by nature?
Black-bellied plover
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
This story uses humor and shocking images to convey the dangers plastic pollution imposes on shorebird species.

In January, Berkeley, Calif., passed a 25-cent tax on disposable cups. (Miriam Gordon)

George Washington University
Recycling is not the answer — not anymore. Here's how a circular economy can both reduce waste and lessen the climate crisis — and why we need to change our mindset now.
View of Earth from Messenger

(NASA)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
As we experience the repercussions of environmental damage, it is easy to dwell on the negatives. But every action and policy people have worked for pays off! Here are six environmental achievements showing ways humanity has not let us down.
Image courtesy of Claudia S. López, PhD, Director of the Multiscale Microscopy Core at Oregon Health & Science University.

(Image courtesy of Claudia S. López/Oregon Health & Science University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
There have been 9.1 billion tons of plastic produced since the 1950s — with no efficient way of getting rid of it. Luckily, a recent college graduate may have found a new solution to combat our plastic waste.
A view in Alaska
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
The next piece in our Stories of Alaska series looks at the human impact, from warming climates to microplastics, in one of the least-inhabited places in the United States — and what we're doing about it.

In 2014, scientists discovered that oyster mushrooms grown in a substrate of used diapers and lignin can break down cellulose found in the diapers for food, which reduces the diapers' weight and volume by up to 80%. (Martin Cooper/Creative Commons)

Suny-ESF
Certain biological processes harbor inherent potential for truly disposing of synthetic waste.

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