plastic

(Photo courtesy of Forbi Perise)

The George Washington University
Plastic pollution is an issue prevalent all throughout Cameroon. One man saw the problem as a challenge to help. Now, he's recycling and upcycling plastic bottles — and inspiring a movement.
George Washington University
Precious Plastic is providing an alternative to the difficult recycling of plastic waste, but transforming it into useful products.
Denver Nuggets mascot shows off a new aluminum cup

Denver Nuggets mascot, Rocky, shows off Ball’s new aluminum cup, which launched at Denver's Pepsi Center this fall as a replacement for plastic cups. (Ball Corporation handout)

SUNY College at Brockport
Ball Corporation takes on replacing the ubiquitous plastic cup at sports venues with aluminum, helping reduce waste and, at CU-Boulder, work toward their plastic-free goals.
Misericordia University
For my first project as a Planet Forward Correspondent, I decided to sit down and chat about recycling with my good friend Gardyney Deshommes, a GLNS major at Misericordia University.

(Devon Camillieri/SUNY-ESF)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
One student's passionate pitch for the Central New York Regional Market to eliminate the use of plastic take-out bags, along with the rest of New York.

Eckerd College President Donald R. Eastman III, center, signs the "Break Free From Plastic" Pledge on Nov. 5, 2019. (Courtesy of Eckerd College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Eckerd College President Donald Eastman III signed the Break Free from Plastic Pledge on Nov. 5, making it the first college in the United States to implement a comprehensive ban of unnecessary single-use plastics.
Charles Darwin bust

A bust of Charles Darwin at the Charles Darwin Foundation. (Christina Trexler/University of Arkansas)

University of Arkansas
"Plasticus Vastum" affects all of our lives, every day, and it is spreading across the Earth at rates unmatched by nearly any other species. 

(Pixabay)

Assistant Editor, Planet Forward
As you pack up for your next trip to the beach, the last thing you want to think about is microplastic. Yet, the issue remains. Challenge yourself to reduce plastic waste with these simple swaps.
The George Washington University
The plastic industry boomed after World War II. But it didn’t take long for reality to sink in. Plastics were polluters. So now what?
Eckerd College
Single-use items are designed to be used for minutes and will still be on the planet for hundreds of years to come. This art installation and video about the project aim to draw attention to "The Plastic Problem."

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