plastic

(Pixabay)

Planet Forward Digital Content Creator | George Washington University
As you pack up for your next trip to the beach, the last thing you want to think about is microplastic. Yet, the issue remains. Challenge yourself to reduce plastic waste with these simple swaps.
The George Washington University
The plastic industry boomed after World War II. But it didn’t take long for reality to sink in. Plastics were polluters. So now what?
Eckerd College
Single-use items are designed to be used for minutes and will still be on the planet for hundreds of years to come. This art installation and video about the project aim to draw attention to "The Plastic Problem."
Microplastics infotext
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Even when most microplastics are consumed by smaller marine species, no animal—including humans—is immune to its risks as it rises through the food chain.
We Tried Living Without Plastics For a Day
We Tried Living Without Plastics For a Day
George Washington University
Plastic is everywhere, but can you avoid it? Watch two college students try by tracking their plastic use and making plastic-free adjustments.
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
The conversation around plastic today is commonly focused on plastic straws and the harm they do to marine life. But we need to look at the bigger picture.
George Washington University
We are seeing water bottle filling stations systems pop up across public spaces, and especially on college campuses. Increasing these stations across the country can help clean up our oceans.
The George Washington University
Why do we need to buy a cucumber that is wrapped in cling wrap, when it is already wrapped by nature?
Black-bellied plover
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
This story uses humor and shocking images to convey the dangers plastic pollution imposes on shorebird species.

In January, Berkeley, Calif., passed a 25-cent tax on disposable cups. (Miriam Gordon)

George Washington University
Recycling is not the answer — not anymore. Here's how a circular economy can both reduce waste and lessen the climate crisis — and why we need to change our mindset now.

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