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Mario Arvelo, Committee on World Food Security Chair, speaks at the introductory session to kick off day one of CFS 46. (Dan Reed/PlanetForward.org)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-ESF
The cool thing about traveling with people you don’t know is the opportunity to figure out who you really are, or at least who you want to be. You can realign with your beliefs and opinions about whatever is going on in the world.

The First Lady of Colombia, María Juliana Ruiz Sandoval (third from left), and director of nutrition at the World Food Programme, Lauren Landis (second from the right), are panelists for the session "Innovation and Agroecology: A Path to Sustainability" at CFS 46. (Kim Ossi/PlanetForward.org)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Mississippi
Technology has touched every sector and aspect of humankind and the food sector is no different. The digital invasion in the agricultural industry is underway. However, these “intruders” are bringing positive changes.

Planet Forward storytellers at FAO headquarters in Rome, Italy, from left: Matilda Kreider, George Washington University; Marisa Umeh, University of California-Berkeley; Lindsay Eberhart, SUNY-ESF; and Rohan Agrawal, University of Mississippi. (Dan Reed/PlanetForward.org)

Planet Forward
Editor's note: This series is generously sponsored by the UN-FAO. All editorial content is created independently.  The 46th annual Committee on World Food Security (CFS) conference brought together leaders from around the world, working toward a... Read More
Alwin Kopse, Swiss Federal Office for Agriculture

Alwin Kopse, of the Swiss Federal Office for Agriculture, speaks at the Committee on World Food Security 45 side event titled, "Agriculture is not cool? Think again. Closing the generation gap."

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Mississippi
In the final part of our four-part series, A Zero Hunger Future, University of Mississippi student Terrius Harris looks at the truth about youth involvement in agriculture — and how we might encourage more young people to join the industry.

On screen, Mario Arvelo, Chair of the Committee on World Food Security, makes his opening statement at the Committee on World Food Security Conference in October 2018. (Planet Forward)

George Washington University
For part three of our series, A Zero Hunger Future, GW student Arianna Dunham reports hunger has been on the rise since 2014, but the U.N. hopes to end world hunger by 2030. How do global leaders plan to reverse the trend?

The team traveling with Planet Forward: Edona Dervisholli, UN-FAO; Harleen Marwah, GW School of Medicine; Sierra Williamson, University of Minnesota; Terrius Harris, University of Mississippi; Arianna Dunham, George Washington University; and Dan Reed, Planet Forward Director. (Planet Forward)

Planet Forward
It may be a Herculean task, but global hunger is not an unsolvable problem. Hundreds of countries around the world are committing themselves to turning its tide by 2030.

GW School of Medicine student Harleen Marwah at the UN-FAO in Rome. (Planet Forward)

George Washington University
Next in our four-part series, A Zero Hunger Future, GW School of Medicine student Harleen Marwah looks at the health sector’s role in the United Nations’ talks on achieving global food security.
University of Minnesota
In the first of our four-part series, A Zero Hunger Future, University of Minnesota's Sierra Williamson looks at how rural development is key to addressing the topic of food security, with the Sustainable Development Goal, Zero Hunger, in mind.