oceans

Lake Erie algal blooms (NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory/Flickr).

George Washington University
The Baltic Sea is choking, and so are many of the creatures that depend on it.  Oxygen levels of the Baltic are so depleted that fish and plant species can’t survive in its waters, making it one of the most polluted seas in the world.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Single-use plastics litter our environment, but there’s something we can all do to help: reduce and refuse single-use plastics. Eckerd College took a stand — and so can you.
Save our oceans
Save our oceans
SUNY ESF
Ocean acidification is a huge threat to our oceans. Ocean acidification is an affect of climate change and the increased emissions of greenhouse gases. Carbon dioxide is absorbed in our oceans, but the oceans cannot hold everything. Too much can... Read More
Northwestern University
The last of three episodes, this podcast focuses on Florida Keys residents' opinions on sea level rise.
Northwestern University
The first of three episodes, this podcast focuses on what sea level rise looks like in the Florida Keys and how it is being addressed.

(Pixabay)

Planet Forward Assistant Editor
As you pack up for your next trip to the beach, the last thing you want to think about is microplastic. Yet, the issue remains. Challenge yourself to reduce plastic waste with these simple swaps.

A magnificent photo of sea, swell, sky, and a monk seal swimming over a coral reef bottom in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. (NOAA/PIFSC/HMSRP)

The George Washington University
What is happening to our coral reefs, and can coral nurseries help with reef restoration?
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
There is more then just plastic in the great pacific garbage patch.
George Washington University
When I arrived in Hampton, Virginia, I met with Jamie Chapman, who has lived in the area for 20 years. Chapman is proud of his waterfront home, which he bought 1998 after the cottage survived double northeasters.
Microplastics infotext
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Even when most microplastics are consumed by smaller marine species, no animal—including humans—is immune to its risks as it rises through the food chain.

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