Nebraska

Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
As the nation finds itself recovering from yet another record-setting and devastating hurricane, NET’s “On the Table” looks at how farmers and ranchers receive federal disaster relief.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
In Episode 5 of NET's “On the Table,” we grapple with the shift toward polarization in American politics. Today’s political landscape is marked by partisan ideology and the farm bill is no exception.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
Sales of organic food have been growing fast and show no signs of slowing down. But what do consumers think they’re buying? In Episode 4 of NET’s “On The Table,” we look at what "organic" means.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
In Episode 3 of NET’s “On the Table,” NPR’s Dan Charles introduces us to a group of farmers with their noses in the dirt and explains why food companies could soon start labeling their products as soil friendly.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
It's the largest hunger program in the federal government and, for people and families who can't afford enough food, it can determine whether or not they go hungry. NET's Grant Gerlock and reporters from Harvest Public Media look at SNAP.
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
These are the stories of where our food comes from, the people who make it, and why one law could change everything. Join NET's Grant Gerlock as he serves up the Farm Bill in delectable audio morsels.
Planet Forward
In mid-September 2017, nine students from seven universities traveled to the middle of the country and met in Lincoln, Nebraska, to begin the journey to the southwestern corner of the state. We were seeking stories about the environment, science,... Read More
Digital Media Producer, Planet Forward
The Ogallala Aquifer is the life source for farming in the High Plains of the United States, but its water levels are in a dangerous state

Farmer Roric Paulman talks with students about the challenges facing the aquifer, about 90 feet beneath their feet. (Planet Forward staff)

University of Missouri
In the face of a changing climate, the agriculture industry is increasingly figuring out how to produce more and use less.
McPheeters family
George Washington University
The popular imagination may think of agriculture as Mom and Dad with a pitchfork, but today’s Nebraskan corn farm is probably the furthest thing from the average arm-chair-futurist’s daydreams of farming reality.

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