nature

Thru-hiking the almost 2,200 mile-long Appalachian Trail is the challenge of a lifetime, but rewards are plentiful along the way. Outstanding views such as this one on Mount Washington, New Hampshire, await hikers ambitious enough to take the trek. (Photo courtesy of Audrey Aug)

Northwestern University
The 2,200-mile Appalachian Trail draws thousands every year to attempt a thru-hike. How are would-be hikers reacting to COVID-19 interfering with plans they've been working on for months — or years?

(Photos by Max Sano/Franklin & Marshall College)

Planet Forward Sr. Correspondent | Franklin & Marshall College
The combination of experiences from environmental and engineering sciences, coupled with working in nature and water systems, left a permanent, venerable impact on my relationship with the natural world.

(Photo by Hana Hancock)

George Washington University
Even if we can't always make it outside, there are proven ways we can keep our spirits up during physical distancing.

Hundreds of Tucson residents are using green spaces during the pandemic like the Loop, a 131-mile paved bikeway that now sees hundreds of daily users. (Jake Meyers / University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Green spaces not only help cities mitigate and adapt to climate change; they can help residents cope with the shock of COVID-19.
Misericordia University
Let's appreciate nature while it is still beautiful and green!

Blue-and-yellow Macaws, Scarlet Macaws, a Chesnut-fronted Macaw and a Mealy Parrot at a clay lick in Peru. (Brian Ralphs/Creative Commons)

Princeton University
I recount my experiences bird-watching around the world and describe the ways in which bird-watching has been a healthy outlet for my anxiety!
SUNY ESF
Cross generational perspective on the past and future of the falls.
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
This story examines the social and ecological problem of having honeybees in the U.S.

With its proximity to Arizona’s natural wonders and historical sites, Flagstaff is a primary destination for tourists coming to Arizona. (Conrad Romero/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
Tourism continues to expand in Arizona, a boon for jobs and tax revenue, but the growth presents challenges to preserving the natural beauty drawing visitors to the state. Tim Royan reports.
Buds on tamarisk trees

Tamarisk trees provide nesting habitat for the endangered southwestern willow flycatchers in Arizona. (Photo by Rachel Charlton/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
Fighting nature with nature seems like a good idea – unless nature doesn’t care about geography. A 20-year-old federal decision to use a beetle to slow the spread of an invasive shrub is hurting an endangered songbird.

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