methane

A colorful sky warms up the landscape view of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China

A view of the Forbidden City from Jingshan Park in Beijing. (Daniel Mathis/Creative Commons 3.0)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Today is the final day of COP26. How should we reflect on the conference? What discussions remain to be tackled?

Food scraps are turned into methane and other gases that are captured and turned into fuel in UC Davis' Renewable Energy Anaerobic Biodigester. (KQED Quest/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
There are only two days left at COP26, and while much progress has been made, there's still more to do. Today learn about how reducing methane could change our climate's course, and explore packaging challenges.
George Washington University
Scientists from the University of California have found that altering cow’s diets by adding seaweed to their feed may just be the next big solution to halt climate change.
Tilling soil

Tilling loosens soil to enable roots to sprout more easily, however it also exposes pockets of 'uneaten' carbon to hungry microbes. (Allan Murray-Rust/Wikimedia)

Northwestern - Medill
From breaking down escaping methane from melting ice caps to storing carbon in non-tilled soils, microbes are already mitigating climate change. 

The UN-FAO reports 26% of the planet’s ice-free land is used for livestock grazing. (Ryan Thompson/U.S. Department of Agriculture)

State University College at Buffalo
It ain't pretty: Our food consumption habits are devastating the planet and contributing to world hunger. What can we do about it?
Bates College
A company has developed a cheaper way to capture carbon emissions and convert them to bioplastic — which could help us reduce our dependence on oil and fossil fuels.
Elon University
EDITOR’S PICK: The average dairy cow produces 148 pounds of manure per day. With 45,000 dairy cows, North Carolina has an annual manure production of 6 billion pounds. What if that waste could be used to power a house? We’re talking about manure... Read More
This week on Bloomberg West, Planet Forward's Frank Sesno explores the how algae can be used to consume harmful greenhouse gases and produce clean energy.
When most people think of wastewater treatment, they probably don’t think of rocket science. Well, at Stanford we are bringing rocket technology to wastewater treatment. Sounds crazy, right? It turns out the two fields have a lot in common. In the... Read More

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