invasive species

A small tree finch on Santa Cruz Island. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
Student scientist Vicki Deng, from Reed College, continues our Galápagos series with a piece about the invasive threats to Darwin's famous finches — and the action plan to help save them.

The Galapagos islands are home to many plants and animals, both terrestrial and aquatic, that are found nowhere else in the world. (Henry Becker/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Next in our Galápagos series, GW's Henry Becker discusses invasive species eradication programs — both the successes and their pitfalls — and explores the controversial topic of biological control.
Planet Forward
The Planet Forward Storyfest 2019 winners traveled with Planet Forward and Lindblad Expeditions for an expedition to the legendary and unique ecosystems of the Galápagos Islands in August 2019, and reported on the unparalleled stories found there.
Celso Montalvo in the Galápagos

Celso Montalvo, who now works as a naturalist with Lindblad Expeditions, shared his experiences with the problematic goat population, growing up in the Galápagos. (Peter Jurich/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
In the first story of our series from our Storyfest 2019 expedition to the Galápagos, Peter Jurich examines an atypical invasive species: Goats. They were brought to the islands in the 1700s, and it took hundreds of years to eradicate them.
SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry
These wanted posters will be used to target specific populations in the affected areas to encourage public participation in invasive species surveying & management.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wild rice is a sustainable food source that is in threat due to climate change.
The George Washington University
How does the D.C. area manage invasive species? Here's a look at the problems local ecosystems face and how experts and volunteers are tackling them.
Buds on tamarisk trees

Tamarisk trees provide nesting habitat for the endangered southwestern willow flycatchers in Arizona. (Photo by Rachel Charlton/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
Fighting nature with nature seems like a good idea – unless nature doesn’t care about geography. A 20-year-old federal decision to use a beetle to slow the spread of an invasive shrub is hurting an endangered songbird.
UW Madison
Lake Mendota is the eyepiece of Madison, a beautiful blue trait that the whole city shares. But underneath its surface are unclear waters. 
SUNY ESF
Invasive species are a threat to the biodiversity of our environment and the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program has implemented several management practices that should be studied and possibly implemented on a larger scale.

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