invasive species

Volunteers pull ice plants in the Martin Dunes in Marina, California, as a part of a project of the Big Sur Land Trust.

Middlebury College
The invasive ice plant can be seen as a metaphor for the components of climate change, from the unbalanced way climate effects different groups to the pervasiveness of the climate crisis in everything we do.
People in the midst of coastal vegetation pulling out invasive ice plants under a blue sky,

Photo taken by Big Sur Land Trust volunteer coordinator Jose Carlos at ice plant pulling event at Martin Dunes, California, on Feb. 19, 2022. (Photo courtesy Jose Carlos)

Middlebury College
In the face of the widespread presence of the ice plant along hundreds of miles of coastline, is there any hope that the California coastal ecosystem could ever be returned to its natural state?
George Washington University
Scientists recently identified an infectious cyanobacterium as the origin of vacuolar myelinopathy, a lethal neurological disease in wildlife.
Asian carp near Lake Michigan

Asian carp swarm waterways near the Great Lakes. (Source: U.S. Congresswoman Mary Kaptur)

George Washington University
Invasive species don't follow shelter in place orders like the officials tasked with containing them. For the Midwest's invasive Asian carp, the effects of halting prevention measures range from not too bad to detrimental.
SUNY-ESF
This podcast looks at how a change in our perception of landscapes has the potential to increase biodiversity and reduce the spread of invasive species, such as the destructive emerald ash borer.
Charles Darwin bust

A bust of Charles Darwin at the Charles Darwin Foundation. (Christina Trexler/University of Arkansas)

University of Arkansas
"Plasticus Vastum" affects all of our lives, every day, and it is spreading across the Earth at rates unmatched by nearly any other species. 

A small tree finch on Santa Cruz Island. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
Student scientist Vicki Deng, from Reed College, continues our Galápagos series with a piece about the invasive threats to Darwin's famous finches — and the action plan to help save them.

The Galapagos islands are home to many plants and animals, both terrestrial and aquatic, that are found nowhere else in the world. (Henry Becker/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Next in our Galápagos series, GW's Henry Becker discusses invasive species eradication programs — both the successes and their pitfalls — and explores the controversial topic of biological control.
Planet Forward
The Planet Forward Storyfest 2019 winners traveled with Planet Forward and Lindblad Expeditions for an expedition to the legendary and unique ecosystems of the Galápagos Islands in August 2019, and reported on the unparalleled stories found there.
Celso Montalvo in the Galápagos

Celso Montalvo, who now works as a naturalist with Lindblad Expeditions, shared his experiences with the problematic goat population, growing up in the Galápagos. (Peter Jurich/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
In the first story of our series from our Storyfest 2019 expedition to the Galápagos, Peter Jurich examines an atypical invasive species: Goats. They were brought to the islands in the 1700s, and it took hundreds of years to eradicate them.

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