Invasive Removal

Volunteers pull ice plants in the Martin Dunes in Marina, California, as a part of a project of the Big Sur Land Trust.

Middlebury College
The invasive ice plant can be seen as a metaphor for the components of climate change, from the unbalanced way climate effects different groups to the pervasiveness of the climate crisis in everything we do.

A small tree finch on Santa Cruz Island. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
Student scientist Vicki Deng, from Reed College, continues our Galápagos series with a piece about the invasive threats to Darwin's famous finches — and the action plan to help save them.
Celso Montalvo in the Galápagos

Celso Montalvo, who now works as a naturalist with Lindblad Expeditions, shared his experiences with the problematic goat population, growing up in the Galápagos. (Peter Jurich/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
In the first story of our series from our Storyfest 2019 expedition to the Galápagos, Peter Jurich examines an atypical invasive species: Goats. They were brought to the islands in the 1700s, and it took hundreds of years to eradicate them.