innovation

An illustration showing a whale entangled by a crab fishing rope, with a small orange crab on the whale's underside, helping by snipping the rope.

Illustrations by Sachi Kitajima Mulkey.

Planet Forward Correspondent | UC Berkeley
A deep dive into how the San Francisco crab fishers are innovating their industry to save whales.
A woman in a pink wrap and head covering looks at a brightly colored, round fabric-covered thermal cooker, with a lidded pot nestled inside. A woman on the right, with long black hair, reaches toward the pot.

Aisata Ibamie, right, a young renewable energy engineer and innovative clean energy activist from Cameroon, demonstrates how her ASAAB Thermal Cooker is used. (Photo courtesy Aisata Ibamie)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Most people in sub-Saharan Africa still use a wood fire to cook food. Aisata Ibamie, a young renewable energy engineer from Cameroon, has a low-tech solution to reduce indoor air pollution and save trees.
A man wearing a blue button-down shirt, with a white mask in his shirt pocket, tan pants, and a bright blue hardhat, stands in front of a large stack of primarily gray plastic bricks.

Nelson Boateng, founder and Chief Executive Officer of NelPlast Eco Ghana Limited, stands in front of some of his award-winning bricks made from recycled plastic. (Photo courtesy Nelson Boateng)

Mandela Washington Fellow
A former tech worker turned eco-entrepreneur in Ghana works to intercept plastics on the way to the landfill by repurposing the plastic into an award-winning building product.
A man and a woman sit close together on a beige couch holding a mid-sized dog with curly blonde fur.

Chris Tonge and Chanel La with their dog Chuckles in their Chicago home. (Courtesy of Chanel La)

Northwestern University
Drawn together like a pair of subatomic particles of opposite charge, scientist duo Chanel La and Chris Tonge are making discoveries in medicine and energy-efficient technology, Brittany Edelmann reports.
Garden bed with green sprouts covered by a dome of plastic sheeting.

A hoop house composed with plastic sheeting and tubes provides cover for a raised garden in Washington, DC. (Lance Cheung/USDA (Public Domain Mark 1.0))

University of Maryland
University of Maryland international Ph.D. student Krisztina Christmon launched her award-winning idea of repurposing farm plastic as part of a university innovation challenge in 2020. One year later, she serves as CEO of Repurpose Farm Plastic LLC.

An event held at the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm, for which Hazon is a supporting partner. (Lottie Spady/Hazon)

SUNY Plattsburgh
Hazon is a Jewish organization that is leading and educating the Jewish community on issues of sustainability and the environment.

(Photo by Cate Twining-Ward)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent
Here are five easy, innovative, and free ways that students can reduce their impact on the environment right now, by using the technology that is at their fingertips.
George Washington University
Precious Plastic is providing an alternative to the difficult recycling of plastic waste, but transforming it into useful products.
Arizona State University
Mexican engineers may have found a solution to the prickly problem of plastic bag waste: make plastic out of cactus juice. The plant-based film breaks down in weeks rather than centuries.
The George Washington University
This podcast explores the carbon control challenge in Costa Rica, and how one community organizer is working to help change the way her country moves.

Pages