indigenous peoples

Planet Forward
What does it mean when ground that has long remained frozen begins to thaw? How can communities respond to the shifting of their very foundations? Research scientist Kelsey Nyland explained at the 2022 Summit.

(Photos courtesy of Cultural Survival/Jamie Malcom-Brown)

George Washington University
The work of Indigenous communities goes unrecognized every day. In an interview with Cultural Survival’s Bia’ni Madsa’ Juárez López, we are able to better understand how Indigenous Peoples are making enormous strides in creating a more sustainable... Read More
Aerial view of the Amazon Rainforest with a winding blue river running through it.

Aerial view of the Amazon Rainforest, near Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas. (Neil Palmer/CIAT https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

George Washington University
Indigenous Peoples play a key factor in the protection of the environment. Here are seven ways in which you can support Indigenous Peoples all around the world.

Oljato-Monument Valley (Nik Shuliahan/Unsplash https://unsplash.com/license)

Northwestern University
Tribal leaders and experts urged members of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Thursday to increase funding for tribal climate initiatives and to give Native American leaders a place in shaping climate policy.

In 2015, in collaboration with Indigenous leaders and Indigenous youth, FAO identified 6 pillars of work and 2 focus areas—Indigenous women and Indigenous youth—as part of FAO’s goal of freeing the world of hunger and malnutrition (Photo courtesy of UN Women/Ryan Brown https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
Indigenous Peoples’ communities' challenges and priorities of “food security, food sovereignty, and health have accelerated and intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to Indigenous Peoples’ Liaison Mikaila Way.
A rainbow in the sky is reflected on the surface of a pond surrounded by green palm trees and foliage.

(Photo by Terrius Harris)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
For many organizations, COVID-19 meant doors closed. Yet at one sacred, Native Hawaiian fishpond, community members worked to advance their efforts to reclaim the land, culture, and traditions of sustainable aquaculture. 
A tide splashing in between two rocks on a coast line as the sun sits low in the sky behind it.

(Photo courtesy of Keegan Houser/Unsplash - https://unsplash.com/photos/W6ZFtDLR27g)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
"Mo‘olelo," or storytelling, is embedded deeply in the Hawaiian culture. Now, groups of Native Hawaiians and allies are using it to destigmatize the traditional practice of fishponds and reunite with their roots.  
A tree on the edge of a forested bluff which looks over a green valley below.

The view from a bluff in the Ponca Wilderness in Compton, Arkansas. These lands, like much of what is now the state of Arkansas, are native to Indigenous peoples including the Osage, Sioux, Quapaw, and Caddo. (Image courtesy of Thomas Shahan/Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/).

Digital Editor, Planet Forward
Indigenous professor Dr. Bethany Henry Rosenbaum asked a powerful question: How do we bridge the Indigenous understanding that removal of Native people is still impactful today with the Western understanding that it’s in the past?
Founding Director, Planet Forward
In our latest episode with PBS's Peril and Promise, produced in association with ASU's Global Futures Laboratory, we meet two individuals looking to the sun for inspiration to move the planet forward.
A fisherman throws a net in the River Tista in Bangladesh

A fisherman fishes in the River Tista in Panjarbhanga, Bangladesh. (Image courtesy FAO/Mohammad Rakibul Hasan)

George Washington University
Small-scale fisheries are critically important to communities around from the world, from Alaska to Senegal, but they don't receive attention on a global level.

Pages