Indigenous

In 2015, in collaboration with Indigenous leaders and Indigenous youth, FAO identified 6 pillars of work and 2 focus areas—Indigenous women and Indigenous youth—as part of FAO’s goal of freeing the world of hunger and malnutrition (Photo courtesy of UN Women/Ryan Brown https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
Indigenous Peoples’ communities' challenges and priorities of “food security, food sovereignty, and health have accelerated and intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to Indigenous Peoples’ Liaison Mikaila Way.
A rainbow in the sky is reflected on the surface of a pond surrounded by green palm trees and foliage.

(Photo by Terrius Harris)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
For many organizations, COVID-19 meant doors closed. Yet at one sacred, Native Hawaiian fishpond, community members worked to advance their efforts to reclaim the land, culture, and traditions of sustainable aquaculture. 

Ruth Miller, 22, grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, nestled 180 miles into the Cook Inlet — the state's oldest gas and oil basin. “Growing up I think I had the safety of innocence in that I saw our state blooming and thriving,” Miller said. (Photo courtesy Christopher J. Carter)

Cal State LA
A young Alaska native leader shares her quest for visibility — both as a youth activist for her people, and for the environment.
Cal State LA
Youth leader and climate activist Ruth Miller talks the good, the bad, and the ugly about the Sept. 21 event.

From Andapa, the distant peaks of Marojejy National Park tower in the northeast, while a view to the southwest mounts Madagascar National Park’s Anjanaharibe-Sud Reserve on the horizon. Both parks are pockets of intact primary forest which house incredible biodiversity. (Vanessa Moss/Sewanee)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Sewanee: The University of the South
Surrounded by protected forest, residents of Ambodivohitra and land managers at the World Wildlife Foundation reveal how commodity crops and wood use affect on-the-ground conservation practices in the rainforests of northeast Madagascar.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
A look at how Ghanaians are reverting back to traditional storytelling in order to save the earth.
Hangin with Grandfather Rocks
SUNY-ESF
Indigenous peoples are going to pave the way for a new system that honors the diverse ecosystems of the world as partners in economic and cultural well-being.