human wildlife conflict

A woman in a white shirt is surrounded by wildlife rangers wearing green jumpsuits. The group holds a large white picture frame with text that reads, "I conquered the Wildlife Ranger Challenge. #ForWildlifeRangers," and five logos of supporting organizations fill the bottom of the frame.

Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo, in white, poses for a photograph at the Wildlife Ranger Challenge, a project to both raise funds and awareness of the struggles facing wildlife rangers across Africa. (Photo courtesy Taku Mutezo)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo has a solution to Zimbabwe's human-wildlife conflict that uses natural and local resources, and benefits the community as well.
Bees maintain harmony between elephants and farmers.

Crop-raiding by migrating African elephants is a pressing issue for many farmers who border protected land. Bees provide an simple, ecologically friendly way to maintain harmony between elephant migrations and the farmers' livelihoods. (Hailey Smalley/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Farmers in East Africa are using bees to deter crop raiding elephants and increase food security in the area.