Food Waste

The George Washington University
Our fall Planet Forward Salon brought food expert and NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey to George Washington University to discuss methods of "Telling the Story of Wasted Food."

Dr. Stephen Carmody founded the Native Cultigen Project at Sewanee: The University of the South. (Photo courtesy Stephen Carmody)

Sewanee: University of the South
By understanding agricultural practices of those indigenous to this region, the Native Cultigen Project may be able to ignite a new wave of sustainable agriculture – one that looks to the past for solutions for the future.
Ask a Farmer: What does Food Waste Look Like for You?
Ask a Farmer: What does Food Waste Look Like for You?
Digital Media Producer, Planet Forward
Farmers from around the world talk about what food waste — or wasted food — means in their country. At what point is the food wasted — post-harvest or post-consumer?
(Photo by Anders Lagerås/Wikimedia Commons)
American University School of Communication
Every fall, pumpkins are a major source of food waste. Here is how you can put your jack-o'-lantern to good use this Halloween.

Screen shot of manjia.org.

George Washington University
Non-profit work in food waste sheds light on the importance of finding the right motive to encourage action when communicating sustainability.

(Photo by Pixabay)

George Washington University
Food waste is a social, economic and environmental triple-threat, bearing serious impacts on the way we live.

Fruitcycle diverts landfill-bound fruits and vegetables and turns them into snacks. (Screenshot from Fruitcycle website.)

George Washington University
D.C. may be a great hub for good food, but it’s also a huge hub for food waste.

(Photo by Jaclyn Merica)

The American Word
Composting is simply nature’s way of breaking down organic waste, relying on microorganisms in the waste to help in the decaying process.
The George Washington University
A video concerning local DC company Fat Worm Compost.        
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
The ESF/SU Food Recovery Network not only reduces food waste and feed the community, but it brings two colleges together, where they normally wouldn't interact.

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