farming

McPheeters Farm

The McPheeters family primarily farms corn, which is sold to Frito-Lay and used to make ethanol. (Laura Whaling/GWU)

Planet Forward Podcast
On this podcast, follow me on my journey to southwestern Nebraska to the McPheeters family farm to learn about their relationship with their land.
NET Nebraska group picture

Our first stop in Nebraska is in Lincoln: NET Nebraska, the headquarters for the state's network of public radio and television stations. Here the group met with experienced storytellers to learn more about environmental challenges that have been covered and the people the reporters met. From left: Dan Reed, Chad Davis, Eleanor Hasenbeck, Ilana Creinin, Laura Waxman, Topanga McBride, Diana Marcum, Laura Whaling, Will Lennon, Sydney Greene, Zack Smith and Kim Ossi.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
In mid-September, nine students from universities across the country met in one of America's agricultural epicenters: Nebraska. We were here to tell some of the environmental stories found in our country's heartland.
Supporting local agriculture - a farmer transplants rice

A farmer works to transplant rice. (International Rice Research Institute)

Eco-Business
A pioneering, crowdfunding platform is bringing individual investors and farmers together for a shared stake in Philippines' agriculture.
The Leafy Green Machine could revolutionize farming.
The Leafy Green Machine could revolutionize farming.
George Washington University
The Leafy Green Machine could revolutionize the future of farming.

A panel from the indoor farm Aeroponics Model 325.

Iowa State Daily
Indoor farming is a new type of farming that can be self-contained and put into indoor spaces.
The George Washington University
Our fall Planet Forward Salon brought food expert and NPR correspondent Allison Aubrey to George Washington University to discuss methods of "Telling the Story of Wasted Food."

Photo: Kid Power DC

American University School of Communication
Urban gardening could be the next step in tackling conflicts with public health in the DMV and its food delivery system.
Featured Contributor
This winter or spring break -- instead of going on school vacation -- consider how you can turn your time off into a time on for learning and serving the earth.

Source: Pexels

Nexus Media
Rising temperatures are turning farming into a high-wire tightrope act. In a hotter, drier, more volatile world, growers have little room to make mistakes, and agricultural know-how is quickly becoming a prized commodity.
Planet Forward, George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs
Throwback Thursday: In preparation for next Friday's Urban Agriculture Symposium, we're highlighting this piece about DC rooftop farming company Up Top Acres. You'll see the farm director at the symposium.

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