farming

Loyola University Chicago
For my love of Nutella and the environment, I take a close look at one of the hazelnut spread's main ingredients: palm oil. Here's what I learned about it — and what companies are doing to reduce the environmental impact.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Georgetown University
Land O'Lakes, Inc.'s Chris Policinski, Discovery, Inc.'s Beth Stewart, Prairie View A&M's Felecia Nave, and Paulman Farms' Roric Paulman spoke about their stories, as leaders — corporate, collegiate and community.
Frank Sesno & Chris Policinski at the 2018 Planet Forward Summit
Land O'Lakes, Inc.
Farmers genuinely care about doing their part to protect our planet, for all the same reasons as anyone else. While it’s a worthy sentiment, I believe it’s time to update our message to reflect the changing reality of our industry.

Mealworms, the larval form of the mealworm beetle, and an edible insect (OakleyOriginals/Creative Commons)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Insect farming has the potential to reduce malnutrition in food insecure areas of the world.
George Washington University
Researchers at UDC are implementing "urban food hubs" in food deserts in DC to teach people how to grow their own food.

My mother and me before her accident.

George Washington University
The true story of my mother's heroism, her tragic bond to Bhopal, and how she taught me to grow (up) organically.
Digital Media Producer, Planet Forward
The Ogallala Aquifer is the life source for farming in the High Plains of the United States, but its water levels are in a dangerous state
George Washington University
On a Planet Forward storytelling trip this fall to Nebraska, I was inspired by the women we met — women not all in roles you'd expect to find on family farms and in the agriculture industry. 
McPheeters Farm

The McPheeters family primarily farms corn, which is sold to Frito-Lay and used to make ethanol. (Laura Whaling/GWU)

Planet Forward Podcast
On this podcast, follow me on my journey to southwestern Nebraska to the McPheeters family farm to learn about their relationship with their land.
NET Nebraska group picture

Our first stop in Nebraska is in Lincoln: NET Nebraska, the headquarters for the state's network of public radio and television stations. Here the group met with experienced storytellers to learn more about environmental challenges that have been covered and the people the reporters met. From left: Dan Reed, Chad Davis, Eleanor Hasenbeck, Ilana Creinin, Laura Waxman, Topanga McBride, Diana Marcum, Laura Whaling, Will Lennon, Sydney Greene, Zack Smith and Kim Ossi.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
In mid-September, nine students from universities across the country met in one of America's agricultural epicenters: Nebraska. We were here to tell some of the environmental stories found in our country's heartland.

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