Ethanol

George Washington University
On a Planet Forward storytelling trip this fall to Nebraska, I was inspired by the women we met — women not all in roles you'd expect to find on family farms and in the agriculture industry. 
The McPheeters Farm

A hilltop on the McPheeters farm in Gothenburg, Nebraska, offers a great vantage point to survey the family's land. (Planet Forward staff)

Arizona State University
“I know that we (farmers) are an integral part of the ecosystem of the Earth,” Nebraska farmer Scott McPheeters said. “We need to make it sustainable for everybody. We have to do it well and do it right.”
Brett Lund
Brett Lund
Planet Forward, George Washington University School of Media and Public Affairs
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