environmental justice

Vermont hiking trail (Famartin / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0))

St. Andrew's Episcopal School
High school student Lily Muhlbaum raised more than $10,000 in a fundraiser to fight environmental racism. She shares insight into what inspired her to act.
McDonald's essential worker

Restaurant employees — often low-wage earners with no employer-provided health insurance — were deemed "essential workers" during the pandemic. (Paul Sableman/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Throughout this pandemic we’ve seen a vast amount of people be affected in different ways. But COVID-19 has especially exposed the discrepancies facing people from marginalized groups.
Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Diaz
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
COVID-19 is impacting both Black and Brown communities disproportionately. This pandemic has brought attention to health disparities, specifically in the Latino population.

A baby zucchini grows beneath a yellow blossom. (Maja Dumat/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
The pandemic may have forced you into a new relationship with food. But the food that ends up on your plate has always traveled a complicated, exploitative, and convoluted path to get there.

Earthlife Africa Johannesburg director Makoma Lekalakala speaks at the Madrid U.N. Climate Change Conference in December 2019. (Photo courtesy of Earthlife Africa Johannesburg)

The George Washington University
In South Africa, a country with the world's largest wealth disparity, poor communities face daily environmental threats. Find out how environmental justice activists are chipping away at this inequality through grassroots efforts.

Ruth Miller, 22, grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, nestled 180 miles into the Cook Inlet — the state's oldest gas and oil basin. “Growing up I think I had the safety of innocence in that I saw our state blooming and thriving,” Miller said. (Photo courtesy Christopher J. Carter)

Cal State LA
A young Alaska native leader shares her quest for visibility — both as a youth activist for her people, and for the environment.
Eckerd College
A day at the beach turns into a disaster when two guys realize that the world's beaches are littered with trash, so they seek justice as they try to change other people's wasteful habits.
SUNY ESF
My story concerns the expansion of the built environment and its possible effects on public health and socio-spatial inequality
Cal State LA
Youth leader and climate activist Ruth Miller talks the good, the bad, and the ugly about the Sept. 21 event.

Judy Hogan, 81, is an environmental activist and author. (Photos by Emma Tobin/UNC-Chapel Hill)

UNC Chapel Hill
Judy Hogan is an 81-year-old environmental activist and writer who has been fighting issues of environmental justice in Chatham County, N.C. for decades, and is now taking on coal ash dumping with little community support.

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