endangered species

Arizona State University
In 1987, condors were on the brink of extinction. Three decades later, the California condor is slowly rebounding.
Razorback sucker fish held by a biologist

Razorback suckers are endemic to the Colorado River Basin and have been listed as endangered since 1991. Thanks to an intensive breeding and stocking program, numbers of the fish have increased in parts of the river and its tributaries. (Photo by Luke Runyon/KUNC)

Arizona State University
Fish in the Colorado River are a product of harsh conditions. But human interference in the rivers they call home has pushed a few to the edge of extinction. Luke Runyon of KUNC reports.

(Laura Whaling/Planet Forward)

UC Berkeley
Part of our Stories of Alaska series, this piece explores the state through wildlife, plants and bioindicators, looking at today's challenges and accomplishments, and signs of what's to come. 
George Washington University
After declining to about 10% of its population over the last century, the hawksbill sea turtle in Belize is on the rise again thanks to expanded legal protections.
(Video by Haley Velasco/Medill News Service)
(Video by Haley Velasco/Medill News Service)
Northwestern University
On Aug. 12, events were held worldwide from Nepal to Canada in honor of World Elephant Day, which aims to raise awareness of the plight of Asian and African elephants due to habitat loss and poaching.

Bald eagle nest along the Chemung River. (Photos by Carrick Palmer)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
There’s something about bald eagles. Yes, they are our national bird and their symbology pervades our culture in many ways and places. But there’s something more to them. 
University of Notre Dame
Climate change adaptation is about helping societies and nature adjust to changing climate. Ecologists need to study example species to reveal key vulnerabilities and design useful strategies for helping biodiversity adjust to climate change. This... Read More
You often hear them before you see them. The American Pika is related to rabbits and hares. But they have round ears and no visible tail. Small enough to fit in your hand they blend in with their rocky surroundings and might dart unnoticed if not... Read More
Global warming has, in part, been responsible for the near collapse of the cultured pearl industry in Japan. Japanese production of pearls in 1966 was 230 tons, today it's 12 tons. Japan is where pearls were first cultured in the early 20th century... Read More