ecology

A bobcat walks in a snowy landscape.
University of Connecticut
Ecologists and statisticians have collaborated to develop a new tracking model that accounts for feline predators' resting periods.
An extreme close up of a tiny robotic bee perched on the end of a toothpick.
George Washington University
Robotic bees are being developed to study buzz pollination and help support the conservation of declining bee populations across the globe.

Shady Creek River during sunset with haze over the water in July 2021. (Shannon Lorusso)

University of Georgia
Messing around in nature at the Shady Creek River, Georgia. Slumbering in an Eno hammock, saving a life, and more…

Clamming on the Puget Sound. (Photo by Olga Baos Mallol)

Unity College
How water pollution is affecting the Southern Resident Orcas and the salmon population in the Puget Sound.
Woman in a black shirt smiles at the camera while holding out an iPhone and standing in front a large monitor showing a page titled "EpiCollect RoadkillGarneau" with a map of the continental U.S. and several charts.

Dr. Garneau presenting research on her RoadkillGarneau project back in 2012. (Gerianne Downs/SUNY-Plattsburgh)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
Dr. Danielle Garneau, wildlife ecologist, is an attentive driver. The serpentine roads of upstate New York, which she drives along daily, are trafficked with possible hazards –– but what she's really scouting for is roadkill. 
A Fowler's toad resting on beach sand.

A Fowler’s toad rests on the sand in Fire Island, New York. (Skylar Epstein/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Dr. Karen Lips hypothesized that the collapse of the amphibian populations was sweeping through Central America like a wave. So, in order to gather evidence for the theory, she would have to get out in front of this wave. 

Many species of reef-building corals, which are vital to the health of ocean ecosystems, face risk of extinction. (Joe Hoyt/NOAA)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
Each year, the International Union of Conservation of Nature is finding more and more plant, animal and fungus species threatened with extinction across the globe. What could be causing it?
winter woodland scene

Climate change is threatening the ecosystem of tunnels beneath the snow, where many rodents, insects, microbes, and hibernators live during the cold winter months. (Aleks G/Creative Commons 3.0)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Underneath the snow lies an ecosystem of tunnels where many rodents, insects, microbes, and hibernators live over the cold winter months. It’s called the subnivium, and it's threatened by climate change.

(Paulina Oswald/Eckerd College)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
In the time of the coronavirus pandemic, our unfounded fear of bats comes to a head. But they are vital part of a balanced ecosystem.
SUNY-ESF
Everyone must purchase goods and services. If environmental costs were factored into these purchases then everyone would have a quasi-interaction with nature.

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