drought

Columbia University
This illustrated children's book explains how drought happens and what individuals (even kids!) can do to conserve water.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Arizona State University
According to N-Drip’s Chief Sustainability Officer, Seth Siegel, their technology brings a new irrigation system that could help save 50% of the water used in Arizona’s agriculture.
A amber sand dune towers over the tiny figures of a group of people.

A towering sand dune in Wadi Rum. (Farzona Comnas/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Jordan's deserts and rocky landscapes have been beloved by Hollywood and cinephiles for decades, yet the country has seen deadly flash floods. How are local environmentalists to respond?
Black and white image of a man walking through a field and past a wirey-looking tree/

(Matthew Cox/The George Washington University)

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Growing up in a family that owns and operates multiple oil fields across Texas, conversations around climate change sparsely came up during my childhood.
Smoke plume and evacuation from the 2018 Woolsey Fire

The smoke plume from the fast-moving Woolsey Fire encroaching on Malibu on Nov. 9, 2018, as residents evacuate along the Pacific Coast Highway. (Cyclonebiskit/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
California's wildfires get worse year after year. Air quality, home evacuations, structure damage, and a whole host of issues plague the state each year. And none of us are surprised.
Planet Forward
Our Hidden Water Footprint Salon earlier this month brought together farmers, businesses, and storytellers to discuss solutions to the global water crisis. 
Joshua Jackson climate extremes ecological threat

Joshua Jackson, researcher at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, explained that heightened ecological threats like drought or famine could lead to more intolerant societies with stricter cultural norms. (Janice Cantieri/Medill)

Northwestern University
Rising extremes of droughts, floods or food shortages can reduce a country’s political stability and cultural tolerance, warned scientists at the American Association for the Advancements of Science conference in Boston.

Source: Pexels

Nexus Media
Rising temperatures are turning farming into a high-wire tightrope act. In a hotter, drier, more volatile world, growers have little room to make mistakes, and agricultural know-how is quickly becoming a prized commodity.
Columbia University
Francesco Fiondella, Planet Forward board member and head of communications at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, visited Kenya to learn how the community makes climate resilient choices.
Planet Forward
As vital climate talks are conducted in Paris, citizens, scientists and others are inventing new ways to "move the planet forward."

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