conservation

A snowy egret walks among green plants in low water.

A snowy egret on the search for something tasty. (William Bay/TRNERR).

Planet Forward Correspondent | Arizona State University
The beautiful landscape of the Tijuana River Estuarine Research Reserve is constantly threatened by human impacts. This is what the estuary's research team is doing about it.
A feral hog searches for food among some rocks.

Feral hogs are a destructive invasive species prevalent across Texas. (Roy Buri/Pixabay)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Texas Tech University
Controlling invasive species can be costly and time-consuming. Watch this video to learn how including them on your plate could be a viable way to manage and even reduce populations.
A painting of a walkway weaving through a cactus garden.

(Linnaea Mallette/publicdomainpictures.net)

George Washington University
California residents have been altering their habits and daily lives due to the state's over 20-year drought conditions. These practices can be an example to others as climate change worsens. 
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
Visiting Scholar, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
How the next generation of naturalists can celebrate and protect the biodiversity of the canal that became a park in the heart of Washington, D.C.
Multiple alligators rest in grass beside a small body of water.

(Belle Long/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Patterns of U.S. land protection prioritize the great landscapes of the West over species richness or biodiversity, which are largely concentrated in the Southeast.
A woman looks at a bat held in her gloved hands and smiles.

Hohoff uses outreach opportunities to dispel misconceptions about bats. “Just showing people a picture of me holding a bat in my hand, they get an idea of scale,” she said. (Image courtesy of Tara Hohoff)

Northwestern University
Sarah Anderson reports: When COVID-19 emerged, conservation researcher Tara Hohoff was instructed to stop handling bats. This wasn’t implemented because the bats might give her the virus, but rather because she could transmit it to the bats.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
In this video essay, Planet Forward Correspondent Kaitlyn Copland reflects on her coastal upbringing and connects it to the importance of ocean conservation and education.
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
This is the story of the history of the passenger pigeon's extinction, their ecological importance, and the project that is working to restore them.
Columbia University
This illustrated children's book explains how drought happens and what individuals (even kids!) can do to conserve water.
University of California, Berkeley
We can do our part in refurnishing our yards, and by extension our cities, for birds to feel at home in our neighborhoods (even though they may not have had a choice in moving in).

Pages