climate strike

The George Washington University
Some of the nation's most prominent Fridays for Future activists explain why they strike for climate, and why the climate movement needs not just the passion from youth, but from everyone.
SUNY Plattsburgh
In this podcast, Correspondent Charles Olsen discusses the experience of organizing the youth climate strike from the perspective of a few of the young organizers.
Young boy stands before climate marchers (Jake Meyers/University of Arizona).

Will this youth-led movement be a tipping point in the climate crisis? (Jake Meyers/University of Arizona).

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Mothers, like Janet Rothers of Arizona, believe it is important to let their young children know that climate change is going on in the world.
SUNY-Plattsburgh
In the second week of international climate striking, Montreal had the biggest turnout of about half a million people, and Greta Thunberg gave a speech.
Greta Thunberg at the Climate Strike in New York

Greta Thunberg on Friday, Sept. 20, during her closing speech for the Climate Strike in New York. (Elina Mariutsa/Northeastern University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northeastern University
With the goal of motivating world leaders, young people have drawn universal attention to global warming in ways that decades of scientific progress could not. 
Northwestern University
More than 200 D.C.-area teens called for climate policy action Friday morning, skipping school to participate in a global climate strike started by Swedish youth activist Greta Thunberg.