climate change

George Washington University
In this mini-documentary, Planet Forward Comcast Sustainable Storytelling Fellow Jelina Liu provides a look into the extensive food recovery network in the United States' capital, Washington, D.C. 
Multiple alligators rest in grass beside a small body of water.

(Belle Long/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Patterns of U.S. land protection prioritize the great landscapes of the West over species richness or biodiversity, which are largely concentrated in the Southeast.
Orange and red fires burns up from browning green grass below under a smokey blue sky.

(Matthias Fischer/Pixabay)

George Washington University
Wildfires are increasing in severity as climate change worsens, and our forests may not be able to grow back like they once could, scientists say.
Planet Forward
What does it mean when ground that has long remained frozen begins to thaw? How can communities respond to the shifting of their very foundations? Research scientist Kelsey Nyland explained at the 2022 Summit.
A field of shrubs under a cloudy sky.

Clouds hang low over Beaufort West, South Africa (Jaunita Swart/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Have we finally cracked the code on controlling the weather? A recent paper suggests that by using drones to charge up the water droplets in clouds, we can cause them to fall as rain.
Arizona State University
In this short documentary, Planet Forward Comcast Sustainable Storytelling Fellow McKenzie Allen-Charmley chronicles the water crisis on the Navajo Nation and changemakers addressing it.
A low, gray storm cloud over a body of water.

A cloud looms over the water of Pacific Harbour, Fiji. (Timothy Ah Koy/Unsplash)

Northwestern University
Climate change threatens El Niño and other ages-old weather systems with severe disruptions. Understanding the baseline influences on this system is key to gauging how it may be altered through climate changes.

Volunteers pull ice plants in the Martin Dunes in Marina, California, as a part of a project of the Big Sur Land Trust.

Middlebury College
The invasive ice plant can be seen as a metaphor for the components of climate change, from the unbalanced way climate effects different groups to the pervasiveness of the climate crisis in everything we do.
Protesters hold a sign that reads "ACT NOW CLIMATE CRISIS"

The COP26 Weymouth Rally and Demonstration on the Global Day of Action for Climate Justice, organized by the COP26 Coalition Dorset Hub (Stephen and Helen Jones/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0 ))

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
Planet Forward Correspondent Kaitlyn Copland sits down with Gregor Sharp, an 18-year-old climate activist, to discuss the power social media has to mobilize individuals for a sociopolitical cause.
A side by side of two forested mountains.

Left: Spain, 2021 (Ryan Bieber/Ithaca College) Right: California, 2019 (Andreas Haslinger/Unsplash)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Ithaca College
There are two huge mountain ranges, on two different continents, both of the same name. The similarities don’t end there either. Both are being increasingly affected by climate change.

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