climate change

A pick-up truck drives through a flooded intersection during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

A pick-up truck drives through a flooded intersection during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. (Jill Carlson/Attribution 2.0 Generic)

The George Washington University
I used to celebrate flash floods as signals of sleeping in and days off from school. Now, I fear the next Hurricane Harvey.
A vast landscape of hills and ice in Greenland.

Greenland's ice sheet is slowly melting. Several sought-after resources are becoming increasingly available as a result. (Mia Rosenblatt)

George Washington University
As the vast Greenland Ice Sheet melts, mining for heavy metals, withdrawals of sediment, and the use of Northern trade routes may expand.
A vibrant pink and purple sunset envelops the Long Island Sound.

A view of the Long Island Sound from my backyard. (Jane Cameron/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Hurricane-battered coastlines are disappearing due to the climate crisis. Without intervention, my community and the town I grew up in are threatened.
A tea set laid out on a well-lit table.

Pu'er is named after a Yunnan town that is an important tea-processing and trading center in the province. (Photo courtesy Manki Kim/Unsplash)

George Washington University
Will the taste of Pu'er tea, associated with memories of my family in China, remain the same despite the effects of climate change?
A roadway in Kashmir is flooded with brown water reaching up to the bumpers of a car.

This is a photo taken by my uncle, Irfan Shahmiri. He is the founder of an organization called CHINAR International which provides humanitarian and disaster relief to Kashmiri families. (Irfan Shahmir)

George Washington University
The recent floods in Pakistan are personal to me because I know what it's like to have your homeland be devastated by a disaster. Here's why you should care too.
A grey, rocky peak juts up from the center of the frame and overlooks trees and a view all the way to a foggy-looking horizon.

View from Hawk Mountain (Rachel Freed/George Washington University)

George Washington University
As climate change worsens and people migrate, seeking safety in higher elevations, Appalachia is expected to become a prime destination for thousands of Americans. How can this new community create a sustainable future?
A tight shot of glacial ice showing the ice's rocky texture and deep blue color.

Up close with the deep blue of glacial ice. (Lisa Palmer/Planet Forward)

Sr. Editor & Education Lead, Planet Forward
Whether it’s a natural landscape, a community, or a feeling inside you, spending time on life’s boundaries can transform your perspective.
Two people stand by the shoreline of a beach, one carrying a clipboard, the other looking down the beach with a monocular.

SCCF shorebird biologist Audrey Albrecht (left) and shorebird intern Elsa Wilson (right) survey shorebirds near Bowman’s Beach. (Sarah Anderson/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
"By participating in shorebird, wading bird and colonial nesting bird surveys, I learned that birds face many more threats than they pose," Sarah Anderson writes.
George Washington University
In this mini-documentary, Planet Forward Comcast Sustainable Storytelling Fellow Jelina Liu provides a look into the extensive food recovery network in the United States' capital, Washington, D.C. 
Multiple alligators rest in grass beside a small body of water.

(Belle Long/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Patterns of U.S. land protection prioritize the great landscapes of the West over species richness or biodiversity, which are largely concentrated in the Southeast.

Pages