climate change

Alaska sunset

A sunset photo from on board the National Geographic Sea Lion, during my recent life-changing trip to Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: While many still find climate change up for debate, perhaps the way to engage and persuade these individuals is by focusing on its effects in their own communities rather than in far away places.
Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park

Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park in southern Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: Climate change isn’t just seen – it’s felt. Weather and temperature fluctuations aside, many experience health impacts caused or exacerbated by climate change.
National Geographic Sea Lion off the coast of Alaska
Planet Forward
Our Planet Forward Storyfest 2018 grand prize winners traveled this June on Alaska Airlines to Sitka. Their destination? The Lindblad Expeditions' National Geographic Sea Lion for an 8-day exploration of the incredible ecosystems along the coastal... Read More

The sun sets on Day 1 in Alaska. (Planet Forward)

The George Washington University
Storyfest 2018 winners traveled to Alaska in June, exploring its ecosystems and finding the stories of sustainability. In story two of our series, watch a video documenting the resilience found in the 49th state, and read Alex's take on the trip.
Northwestern University
Alaskan Native Americans face problems with reduced number of salmon due to climate change.
Navajo Generating Station

The Navajo Generating Station, a coal fired power-plant near Page, Arizona. (Myrabella/Wikimedia Commons)

State University College at Buffalo
Climate scientists from around the globe have laid out the maximum amount of CO2 that can be emitted into the atmosphere while still maintaining the 2°C increase in temperature. This threshold is called the carbon budget. But what exactly is it?

(Photo courtesy Andreas Carlgren)

Loyola University Chicago
Sweden's former Minister of the Environment, Andreas Carlgren, instructs students at The Newman Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, and in this Q&A, provides unique insight into the environmental consciousness that pervades the country.
Tara McLaughlin, president of Kalu Yala Institute

Tara McLaughlin, president of Kalu Yala Institute, speaks about her background doing volunteer work abroad and current efforts of Kalu Yala to increase integration with San Miguel. (Abigail Foerstner/Medill)

Northwestern University
Real estate entrepreneur Jimmy Stice hopes to build small, sustainable houses in Kalu Yala, the jungle retreat, eco-town, and host to an institute for college interns he founded in the Panamanian rainforest. Medill's Leah Dunlevy reports.
Northwestern University
Medill's Nefertari Bilal reports: The rise of tourism in Guna Yala promises profit, but locals face challenges posed by both globalization that tourism brings and the threat of the industry's collapse, posed by climate change. 
Zoe St. John farm tour

Kalu Yala agriculture director Zoe St. John discusses the food they are growing to feed the community. (Colin Boyle/Medill)

Northwestern University
Kalu Yala is host to small scale agroforestry in the Panamanian jungle — rows of alternating crops integrated with the natural environment, an image of the symbiosis that can exist between humans and the environment. Grace Wade reports for Medill.

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