climate adaptation

A woman in a white shirt is surrounded by wildlife rangers wearing green jumpsuits. The group holds a large white picture frame with text that reads, "I conquered the Wildlife Ranger Challenge. #ForWildlifeRangers," and five logos of supporting organizations fill the bottom of the frame.

Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo, in white, poses for a photograph at the Wildlife Ranger Challenge, a project to both raise funds and awareness of the struggles facing wildlife rangers across Africa. (Photo courtesy Taku Mutezo)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo has a solution to Zimbabwe's human-wildlife conflict that uses natural and local resources, and benefits the community as well.
Moss-covered temple in Cambodia

This temple at Angkor Wat in Krong Siem Reap, Cambodia, shows how nature adapted to grow around a man-made structure. But how will humans adapt to changes in nature due to climate change? (James Wheeler/Unsplash)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Today is day nine of COP26, and the theme is adaptation, loss, damage, and resilience.

(Hush Naidoo/Unsplash)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Wisconsin’s future may be warm, wet and insect-ridden, a new climate change study released by University of Wisconsin researchers finds.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Reed College
The urban heat island effect is of increasing concern for cities around the world. But fear a little bit less--there are solutions in the works. 
World leaders enter to speak at the Global Commission on Adaptation

Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Netherlands Prime Minister Mark Rutte, and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva enter the Hall of Knights. (Molly Glick/Northwestern University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
This Tuesday marked the launch of the Global Commission on Adaptation, an environmental initiative led by Bill Gates, former U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva.
SUNY-ESF
Synopsis of the recent New York State's Harmful Algal Bloom Summit hosted by SUNY-ESF in Syracuse, New York.
University of Wisconsin-Madison
A look at how Ghanaians are reverting back to traditional storytelling in order to save the earth.
The George Washington University
Discussions of climate change impacts and mitigation often fail to include marginalized communities, especially those most effected.
Middlebury College
Building the sustainable home through the reconstructing the nature of being.
Joshua Jackson climate extremes ecological threat

Joshua Jackson, researcher at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, explained that heightened ecological threats like drought or famine could lead to more intolerant societies with stricter cultural norms. (Janice Cantieri/Medill)

Northwestern University
Rising extremes of droughts, floods or food shortages can reduce a country’s political stability and cultural tolerance, warned scientists at the American Association for the Advancements of Science conference in Boston.

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