biofuel

Ole Miss student Lindsay Fox discovers how one big food company is trimming the fat off its wasteful processes.
National Science Foundation
Mixed prairie grasses, grown on degraded land, may be a better source of biofuel than corn ethanol or soybean biodiesel. The study, led by David Tilman at the University of Minnesota, showed that fuel made from prairie grass yields 51 percent more... Read More
Planet Forward
Students at Gonzaga University are working on a machine that can make fuel pellets out of corn stover and animal waste as a project for the EPA's P3 research competition.
KQED/Quest
For years there's been buzz -- both positive and negative -- about generating ethanol fuel from corn. The Bay Area is rapidly becoming a world center for the next generation of green fuel alternatives. Meet the scientists investigating the newest... Read More
KQED/Quest
In a co-production with NOVA Science Now, QUEST explores the potential of algae once considered nothing more than pond scum to become the fuel of the future. Entrepreneurs from the Bay Area to LA are working to create the next generation of biofuels... Read More
Ethanol’s gotten a bit of a bad rap here in the States of late, largely due to the billions of dollars of federal subsidies that are paid to the oil companies each year to blend this renewable domestic fuel into our gasoline. There's been plenty of... Read More
Bob wants even marginal land to be productive, growing energy crops for advanced, sustainable biofuels. He wants food processors to get added value for their residues and waste. He wants to solve a logistics problem. Biomass is expensive to... Read More
Bob has an idea and you can help. Car companies are working on engines that use things like variable timing, compression ratios, etc., to get the same or similar mileage no matter what blends of gasoline and ethanol you use. Tell the car... Read More
Turning algae into the next renewable resource by making it in to plastics, bio fuels, nutritional supplements as well as animal feed. The algae will be grown in the non-potable water that is left over from reverse osmosis.
Walter Cronkite School, Arizona State University
Algae are simple photosynthetic organisms that are an original carbon source for petroleum products. Researchers at Arizona State University are growing algae and converting it into fuel. In this video ASU researchers explain how their turning... Read More

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