bats

A woman looks at a bat held in her gloved hands and smiles.

Hohoff uses outreach opportunities to dispel misconceptions about bats. “Just showing people a picture of me holding a bat in my hand, they get an idea of scale,” she said. (Image courtesy of Tara Hohoff)

Northwestern University
Sarah Anderson reports: When COVID-19 emerged, conservation researcher Tara Hohoff was instructed to stop handling bats. This wasn’t implemented because the bats might give her the virus, but rather because she could transmit it to the bats.
A white-gloved hand hold a tawny colored bat with a white substance on it's nose.

A tri-colored bat displays symptoms of white-nose syndrome at from Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Georgia (National Park Services/ Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
While much of the nation's human population has been able to take advantage of promising vaccines against their disease, the same can not be said for America’s dwindling numbers of bats.