aquaculture

Man stands in water holding a bushel of oysters in a net.

Michael Doall holds a bag of oysters in Shinnecock Bay, Long Island in the fall of 2021. He was part of an oyster reef monitoring project that also involved setting up a predator exclusion experiment to evaluate the effects of predation on hard clam restoration efforts. (Courtesy of Michael Doall)

Georgetown University
Through regenerative aquaculture, Michael Doall is using the ecosystem services of oysters and kelp to clean up our oceans and our plates.
Infographic showing protein sequencing process and aquaculture components in New Zealand.

Click to expand. (Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Paving the way for the future of New Zealand’s aquaculture industry, The Cawthron Institute is collaborating with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and Wakatū Incorporation to study the native species of karengo.

In 2015, in collaboration with Indigenous leaders and Indigenous youth, FAO identified 6 pillars of work and 2 focus areas—Indigenous women and Indigenous youth—as part of FAO’s goal of freeing the world of hunger and malnutrition (Photo courtesy of UN Women/Ryan Brown https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/).

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
Indigenous Peoples’ communities' challenges and priorities of “food security, food sovereignty, and health have accelerated and intensified during the COVID-19 pandemic,” according to Indigenous Peoples’ Liaison Mikaila Way.
A rainbow in the sky is reflected on the surface of a pond surrounded by green palm trees and foliage.

(Photo by Terrius Harris)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
For many organizations, COVID-19 meant doors closed. Yet at one sacred, Native Hawaiian fishpond, community members worked to advance their efforts to reclaim the land, culture, and traditions of sustainable aquaculture. 
A tide splashing in between two rocks on a coast line as the sun sits low in the sky behind it.

(Photo courtesy of Keegan Houser/Unsplash - https://unsplash.com/photos/W6ZFtDLR27g)

Planet Forward FAO Fellow | University of Oklahoma
"Mo‘olelo," or storytelling, is embedded deeply in the Hawaiian culture. Now, groups of Native Hawaiians and allies are using it to destigmatize the traditional practice of fishponds and reunite with their roots.  
The George Washington University
Environmentalists and scientists have always asked, how can we save our oceans? One solution, aquaculture, instead asks us to look at ways in which the world's oceans can save themselves.

Raw, boiled, fermented, alive, fluorescent, it's all edible, mostly. (Illustration by Michaela Compo/George Washington University)

George Washington University
An exploration of the untapped value of cephalopods and algae in a sustainable seafood diet.

David Weedman is the aquatic habitat program manager for the Arizona Game & Fish Department. He and his team dropped hundreds of Georgia cubes into Bartlett Lake this summer to help create habitat for fish. (Photos by Dylan Simard/Cronkite News)

Arizona State University
It isn't easy being a fish in the desert in Arizona. But Arizona Game & Fish Department is trying to improve the habitat conditions for the fish in warm weather lakes.
A fisherman throws a net in the River Tista in Bangladesh

A fisherman fishes in the River Tista in Panjarbhanga, Bangladesh. (Image courtesy FAO/Mohammad Rakibul Hasan)

George Washington University
Small-scale fisheries are critically important to communities around from the world, from Alaska to Senegal, but they don't receive attention on a global level.
University of Florida
Ferns for Feed is a company which installs patent-pending aquaculture systems which have the ability to rapidly sequester carbon. By utilizing the aquatic fern azolla, aquaculture systems become more self sufficient as azolla is capable of purifying... Read More

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