alaska

(Victoria Middleton/Planet Forward)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Storyfest 2022 winner Delaney Graham reflects on the scale of Alaska — and how that grand size helped put things into perspective.

(Jennifer Cuyuch/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Farzona Comnas, one of our 2022 Storyfest winners and travelers, shares her thoughts about the experience in Alaska, and her feelings about human impact.

(Halley Hughes/University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Storyfest 2022 traveler Halley Hughes gives her thoughts on the trip to Alaska with Lindblad Expeditions, from wildlife to plant life — and what new inspirations she found.
A girl with long black hair, wearing a bright orange life jacket takes a photograph with an SLR camera. Behind her are light grey waters, a rocky coastline, and a stand of evergreens.

Jennifer Cuyuch takes a photo while aboard a zodiac boat in Alaska on the 2022 Storyfest trip with Lindbald Expeditions. (Delaney Graham/SUNY-ESF)

George Washington University
Jennifer Cuyuch, one of our 2022 Storyfest travelers, shares her thoughts about the experience aboard the National Geographic Sea Lion for a week with Lindblad Expeditions.
Sr. Editor & Education Lead, Planet Forward
Part of the Planet Forward team has been traveling in Alaska with our wonderful partners, Lindblad Expeditions, and our 2022 Storyfest winners. Here's a preview of what they experienced!
Planet Forward
What does it mean when ground that has long remained frozen begins to thaw? How can communities respond to the shifting of their very foundations? Research scientist Kelsey Nyland explained at the 2022 Summit.
Cold Groundwater flowing into the Deshka River
Cold Groundwater flowing into the Deshka River
Middlebury College
There has been a longstanding consensus that ocean conditions are the primary driver for lower salmon returns. But in July of 2020, a study offered groundbreaking evidence that freshwater habitat health may play a large role too.

Ruth Miller, 22, grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, nestled 180 miles into the Cook Inlet — the state's oldest gas and oil basin. “Growing up I think I had the safety of innocence in that I saw our state blooming and thriving,” Miller said. (Photo courtesy Christopher J. Carter)

Cal State LA
A young Alaska native leader shares her quest for visibility — both as a youth activist for her people, and for the environment.

(Photos by Colton Stevens/Northeastern University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northeastern University
In a fight that extends from a small, native Alaskan village all the way to Washington, short-term economic benefits clash with long-term environmental responsibility.

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