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(Alan Vernon/flickr)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Ithaca College
HappyWhale, a website created in 2015, uses a unique algorithm to identify and track humpback whales. It relies on photographs from ordinary people to further scientific research.
A wave breaks on a dark blue ocean, unleashing a cascade of white foam.

(Ivan Bandura/Unsplash)

Georgetown University
Traditional Indigenous mariculture practices are easier on the environment and sustainably produce delicious seafood.
Labor activists join environmentalists wearing turtle costumes at the 1999 WTO protests in Seattle, Washington.

Labor activists join environmentalists wearing turtle costumes at the 1999 WTO protests in Seattle, Washington. (Courtesy of the Seattle Municipal Archives, Item 175623)

Georgetown University
I interview labor and environmental activist Joe Uehlein about the historic intersections between those two activist movements and how he tells those stories in his music.
The author stands next to a statue of Nelson Mandela in front of a large, tan building. Both Beverly and Mandela hold up a raised fist.

(Lisa Palmer/PlanetForward.org)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Ten weeks of this past summer have made the most defining moments of my career, my personal and my professional development in journalism. I have been in the United States of America enriching and being enriched by local U.S. communities, honing... Read More

(photo by Ezra Jeffrey-Comeau/Unsplash)

Multimedia Editor, Planet Forward
This year's team hails from 12 different universities from across the country. Click through to learn more about the exceptional students selected for our 22-23 cohort.  
A small white boat rests buoyed on clear, blue-green waters under a cloudy blue sky with a gentle mountain in the distance.

The shores of Pointe d'Esny, Mauritus, as seen from Île aux Aigrettes, one of the most prominent reserves in the Indian Ocean, on July 21, 2022. Almost two years prior, this water was blackened by an oil spill from the MV Wakashio. (Zoey England/University of Connecticut)

University of Connecticut
This July marks two years since the MV Wakashio oil spill. Though environmental NGOs have left the island and news coverage of the disaster has ceased, youth around Mauritius are still reeling from the effects of the tragedy.
Yellow leaves of kelp swaying in a blue ocean.

(Oleksandr Sushko/Unsplash)

Georgetown University
How making kelp commonplace in our diets and adapting harvested biomass into various materials will help both humans and the planet.
A grey, rocky peak juts up from the center of the frame and overlooks trees and a view all the way to a foggy-looking horizon.

View from Hawk Mountain (Rachel Freed/George Washington University)

George Washington University
As climate change worsens and people migrate, seeking safety in higher elevations, Appalachia is expected to become a prime destination for thousands of Americans. How can this new community create a sustainable future?
A woman in a pink wrap and head covering looks at a brightly colored, round fabric-covered thermal cooker, with a lidded pot nestled inside. A woman on the right, with long black hair, reaches toward the pot.

Aisata Ibamie, right, a young renewable energy engineer and innovative clean energy activist from Cameroon, demonstrates how her ASAAB Thermal Cooker is used. (Photo courtesy Aisata Ibamie)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Most people in sub-Saharan Africa still use a wood fire to cook food. Aisata Ibamie, a young renewable energy engineer from Cameroon, has a low-tech solution to reduce indoor air pollution and save trees.
A woman in a white shirt is surrounded by wildlife rangers wearing green jumpsuits. The group holds a large white picture frame with text that reads, "I conquered the Wildlife Ranger Challenge. #ForWildlifeRangers," and five logos of supporting organizations fill the bottom of the frame.

Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo, in white, poses for a photograph at the Wildlife Ranger Challenge, a project to both raise funds and awareness of the struggles facing wildlife rangers across Africa. (Photo courtesy Taku Mutezo)

Mandela Washington Fellow
Wildlife lawyer and farmer Taku Mutezo has a solution to Zimbabwe's human-wildlife conflict that uses natural and local resources, and benefits the community as well.

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