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Slender fish handing from a line between wooden posts with large trees, mountains, and a body of water in the background.

Sun-dried candlefish, also known as hooligan, eulachon, and oolichan. (Brodie Guy/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

George Washington University
Today, petroleum is one of Alaska's main exports, but the use of oil in the region goes back thousands of years to the Tlingit people's harvesting of lipid-dense and flammable candlefish. Can this history illuminate a way to a green-fueled future?
A bright blue sky stands behind towering mountains carved deep in the center by ancient glaciers. On the right a bright orange life jacket and camera lens are visible of a photographer capturing the scene aboard a small boat. Blue-green water is immediately in the foreground.

Ancient glaciers carved this canyon in Tracy Arm Fjord thousands of years ago. Our group sailed via Zodiac to the glacier’s face. (Halley Hughes/University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
An expedition with Lindblad in Southeast Alaska shows the realities of climate change and uncovers the mysteries behind the "language" of rocks.
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
"Go With the Flow," original video/music by Ron Cohen
Visiting Scholar, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
How the next generation of naturalists can celebrate and protect the biodiversity of the canal that became a park in the heart of Washington, D.C.
George Washington University
In this mini-documentary, Planet Forward Comcast Sustainable Storytelling Fellow Jelina Liu provides a look into the extensive food recovery network in the United States' capital, Washington, D.C. 
Four individuals wade in shallow water in a passing of mangrove trees, each with an orange bucket.

Volunteers plant mangrove saplings to help restore the canopy at Benedict Key. (Sarah Anderson/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
Volunteers helping in recovery at Benedict Key aim to build up an oyster reef to shield the fledgling mangroves from destructive waves, Sarah Anderson reports.
Multiple alligators rest in grass beside a small body of water.

(Belle Long/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Patterns of U.S. land protection prioritize the great landscapes of the West over species richness or biodiversity, which are largely concentrated in the Southeast.
A man in a purple jacket and beige cap smiles at a woman in a sweatshirt who is holding water samples. They are both sitting on the ledge of a boat.

SCCF marine laboratory director Eric Milbrandt (left) and research assistant Sierra Greene (right) collect water samples to help identify the drivers of harmful algal blooms in southwest Florida. (Sarah Anderson/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
Excessive algae growth wreaked havoc on southwest Florida’s ecosystems, Sarah Anderson reports. A team of scientists is analyzing water samples to figure out what’s driving the blooms –– and how to mitigate them.

(Victoria Middleton/Planet Forward)

SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
Storyfest 2022 winner Delaney Graham reflects on the scale of Alaska — and how that grand size helped put things into perspective.

(Jennifer Cuyuch/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Farzona Comnas, one of our 2022 Storyfest winners and travelers, shares her thoughts about the experience in Alaska, and her feelings about human impact.

(Halley Hughes/University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
Storyfest 2022 traveler Halley Hughes gives her thoughts on the trip to Alaska with Lindblad Expeditions, from wildlife to plant life — and what new inspirations she found.

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