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Lake Thingvallavatn is shown amid a landscape of snowy mountains.

Lake Thingvallavatn in Iceland used to freeze solid in the winter. Now, it is beginning to thaw. (Axel Kristinsson/Creative Commons 2.0)

Dartmouth College
On March 9, 2017, a strange crack appeared on the ice-laden surface of Thingvallavatn, the largest lake in Iceland.

A view of the Danskammer Generating Station in Newburgh, N.Y., as seen from a train traveling on the other side of the Hudson River. (TomKonrad/Creative Commons)

The George Washington University
Before COVID-19 hit, there was another global crisis impacting people’s health and economic security: climate change. Here's how three environmental organizations are fighting for their communities during a pandemic.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
In this episode, we have a follow-up appointment with Dr. Leana Wen, who served as the Health Commissioner for the City of Baltimore and is a visiting professor of health policy and management at GW.
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
As climate change worsens wildfires, what can the U.S. learn from Australia's fires?
George Washington University
100 community scientists flood Houston streets to track where it's the hottest in hopes to inform climate mitigation plans.
The bridge in Ellicott City among debris after the flooding in 2016.

The Ellicott City bridge among debris and boarded-up shop doors after the devastating 2016 flood (Photo Courtesy of Preservation Maryland/Creative Commons).

George Washington University
The community of Ellicott City, MD is working together to protect against future devastating floods.

(Photo courtesy of Forbi Perise)

The George Washington University
Plastic pollution is an issue prevalent all throughout Cameroon. One man saw the problem as a challenge to help. Now, he's recycling and upcycling plastic bottles — and inspiring a movement.

(Aleksey Kuprikov/Pexels)

University of Wisconsin-Madison
Ecologists and epidemiologists have been predicting a pandemic like COVID-19 for years, revealing the deep-seated relationships between animal health, human health, and planetary health. 

(Image by Arielle Bader)

George Washington University
As the COVID-19 pandemic soared around the world, people turned to science for answers. Science communicators were on the front lines of understanding the virus, reporting trustworthy science and battling the spread of misinformation. 

(Paulina Oswald/Eckerd College)

Eckerd College
In the time of the coronavirus pandemic, our unfounded fear of bats comes to a head. But they are vital part of a balanced ecosystem.

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