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Razorback sucker fish held by a biologist

Razorback suckers are endemic to the Colorado River Basin and have been listed as endangered since 1991. Thanks to an intensive breeding and stocking program, numbers of the fish have increased in parts of the river and its tributaries. (Photo by Luke Runyon/KUNC)

Arizona State University
Fish in the Colorado River are a product of harsh conditions. But human interference in the rivers they call home has pushed a few to the edge of extinction. Luke Runyon of KUNC reports.
SUNY Plattsburgh
The story of maps and the connection between humanity and the places we live: A podcast interview with Molly Brown, an artist and geographer.
A sign on the side of the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts theater, across from summit headquarters in the Moscone Center, offers an important message for attendees of the “Global Climate Action Summit.” (Aaron Dorman/Medill)
Northwestern University
What were the main commitments and news items to come out of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco in September?
Nebraska's PBS & NPR stations
As the nation finds itself recovering from yet another record-setting and devastating hurricane, NET’s “On the Table” looks at how farmers and ranchers receive federal disaster relief.
George Washington University
In the final piece of our Alaska series, watch this video and hear about the connections made with those in Alaska using different types of storytelling, and how we might find our own stories.
Alaska sunset

A sunset photo from on board the National Geographic Sea Lion, during my recent life-changing trip to Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: While many still find climate change up for debate, perhaps the way to engage and persuade these individuals is by focusing on its effects in their own communities rather than in far away places.
Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
Watch this video, part of our Alaska series, to learn more about the Inian Islands Institute and how one family is keeping things running in the Alaskan wilderness, mostly cut off from the outside world.
Inian Institute

The Inian Islands Institute, dubbed the “hobbit hole” by its residents, sits in a remote area near where the Inside Passage meets the Gulf of Alaska. This patch of land has been a hotbed of human activities for centuries; from Tlingit summer fishing camp to fox farm homestead. Now in the hands of scientists the land is used as an ecological research field camp. (Photos by Shandra Furtado/George Washington University)

George Washington University
In this photo essay, part of our Stories of Alaska series, learn about a climate and nature research center hidden among the temperate forests speckled along Alaska's southeastern coast: the Inian Islands Institute.
Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Stories of Alaska series: Learn about how climate change and overfishing are threatening marine species. But Alaska sets a prime example of how to maintain a sustainable fish supply.
Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park

Mountains near Glacier Bay National Park in southern Alaska. (Photos by Katherine Baker/Columbia University)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Columbia University
Next in our Alaska series: Climate change isn’t just seen – it’s felt. Weather and temperature fluctuations aside, many experience health impacts caused or exacerbated by climate change.

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