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Digital Editor, Planet Forward
When our 2022 Storyfest winners, traveling with Lindblad Expeditions, explored Alaska's vast and remote terrain, they were surprised that instead of feeling separated, they felt more connected.
SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
In this sequel to “Coastal Degradation Through Fresh Eyes,” Amka and Suka meet a new friend who introduces them to the issue of melting glaciers and revitalizes them to get back on track with their environmental mission.
A tight shot of glacial ice showing the ice's rocky texture and deep blue color.

Up close with the deep blue of glacial ice. (Lisa Palmer/Planet Forward)

Sr. Editor & Education Lead, Planet Forward
Whether it’s a natural landscape, a community, or a feeling inside you, spending time on life’s boundaries can transform your perspective.
A dark plate sits on a wooden table holding artfully placed plant-based food.

One of the many plant based dishes at Rasoterra (Courtesy of Mariano Martinez)

George Washington University
By working exclusively with local producers and using traditional Spanish cooking techniques, the chefs at Barcelona restaurant Rasoterra create rich and sustainable vegan meals that highlight the possibilities of the city's culinary tradition.
The view from green-blue waters of a mountain in the distance between two rocky landmasses in the midground.

(Jennifer Vilcarino/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Climate change doesn't just exist in data but before our eyes. Lindblad Expeditions naturalist Tim Martin explains that the rust-colored trimlines imprinted on Alaskan mountains paint a clear picture of glacial recession.
A man and a woman sit close together on a beige couch holding a mid-sized dog with curly blonde fur.

Chris Tonge and Chanel La with their dog Chuckles in their Chicago home. (Courtesy of Chanel La)

Northwestern University
Drawn together like a pair of subatomic particles of opposite charge, scientist duo Chanel La and Chris Tonge are making discoveries in medicine and energy-efficient technology, Brittany Edelmann reports.
A crowd of protestors march toward a body of water. A protest sign reads "Evict Enbridge."

At the Heart of the Turtle Gathering, protestors called for the shutdown of Enbridge Line 5 and cancellation of the proposed tunnel project. (Samantha Anderer/Medill)

Northwestern University
Land management debates puncture the broader political context of energy, oil and climate change, Samantha Anderer reports. In northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula, controversy surrounds the Enbridge Line 5 oil pipeline.
Two people stand by the shoreline of a beach, one carrying a clipboard, the other looking down the beach with a monocular.

SCCF shorebird biologist Audrey Albrecht (left) and shorebird intern Elsa Wilson (right) survey shorebirds near Bowman’s Beach. (Sarah Anderson/MEDILL)

Northwestern University
"By participating in shorebird, wading bird and colonial nesting bird surveys, I learned that birds face many more threats than they pose," Sarah Anderson writes.
Slender fish handing from a line between wooden posts with large trees, mountains, and a body of water in the background.

Sun-dried candlefish, also known as hooligan, eulachon, and oolichan. (Brodie Guy/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

George Washington University
Today, petroleum is one of Alaska's main exports, but the use of oil in the region goes back thousands of years to the Tlingit people's harvesting of lipid-dense and flammable candlefish. Can this history illuminate a way to a green-fueled future?
A bright blue sky stands behind towering mountains carved deep in the center by ancient glaciers. On the right a bright orange life jacket and camera lens are visible of a photographer capturing the scene aboard a small boat. Blue-green water is immediately in the foreground.

Ancient glaciers carved this canyon in Tracy Arm Fjord thousands of years ago. Our group sailed via Zodiac to the glacier’s face. (Halley Hughes/University of Arizona)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
An expedition with Lindblad in Southeast Alaska shows the realities of climate change and uncovers the mysteries behind the "language" of rocks.

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