New Ideas

An image of a cherry orchard filled with white blossoms.

The cherry orchard the author grew up on in Niagara County, N.Y. (Caleb Seib/SUNY-ESF)

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
Intentionally developing place connections will allow us to create environmental actions that are community-driven.
winter woodland scene

Climate change is threatening the ecosystem of tunnels beneath the snow, where many rodents, insects, microbes, and hibernators live during the cold winter months. (Aleks G/Creative Commons 3.0)

Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
Underneath the snow lies an ecosystem of tunnels where many rodents, insects, microbes, and hibernators live over the cold winter months. It’s called the subnivium, and it's threatened by climate change.
SUNY-ESF
Learn about biodiversity through the short story of a tree that is witnessing the impact of humans on its environment—from canopy loss to animal migration.
George Washington University
How does being a college athlete make my environmental footprint larger? And what can I — and my school — do about it?
Founder and Chief Executive, Planet Forward
When will we climb out of our COVID caves? It all depends on vaccine distribution. West Virginia's Krista Capehart, who helped with the state's distribution plan, discusses lessons learned and strategy.
Northwestern University
Global warming may make infectious diseases such as COVID-19 more widespread by changing disease progression and interaction among people, warn health and climate experts. Ester Wells reports for Medill.
George Washington University
Disposable period care products can have a huge environmental impact. Here are five brands selling sustainable alternatives to reduce the waste from periods around the world.
Researcher Laura Mattas climbs rocky terrain
Northwestern University
A look at some of the women doing research in Antarctica and the lingering barriers that were set up to keep them out. Wyatt Mosiman reports for Medill.
Robert Rosner and Suzet McKinney stand on either side of the Doomsday Clock, which reads "It is 100 seconds to midnight."

Robert Rosner, left, chair of the Bulletin Science and Security Board, and board member Suzet McKinney unveil the time on the Doomsday Clock at a Zoom news conference on Jan. 27. Rosner is a professor of astrophysics at the University of Chicago, and McKinney is CEO and executive director of the Illinois Medical District. (Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists)

Northwestern University
Scientists sound the alarm on climate change and nuclear risk as the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced the 2021 time for its historic clock, which counts down to a “midnight” apocalypse. Carlyn Kranking reports.
Syracuse University
Thrifting is not only great for the environment, but amazing for the human soul.

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