New Ideas

University of Connecticut COP26 delegates stand with Sudanese-American poet and activist, Emtithal "Emi" Mahmoud, before a blue background

University of Connecticut COP26 delegates stand with Sudanese-American poet and activist, Emtithal "Emi" Mahmoud, center. (University of Connecticut)

University of Connecticut
The UN COP conferences would be different if we listened more intently to those being directly impacted by the climate crisis.

Oljato-Monument Valley (Nik Shuliahan/Unsplash https://unsplash.com/license)

Northwestern University
Tribal leaders and experts urged members of the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis Thursday to increase funding for tribal climate initiatives and to give Native American leaders a place in shaping climate policy.
Yellow straws sit on the display case in front of a menu at a coffee shop.

Reusable "Simply Straws" for sale at Kahwa Coffee Roasting in St. Petersburg, Florida (Carter Weinhofer/Eckerd College).

Planet Forward Correspondent | Eckerd College
In the first piece in our "So Long, Single-Use?" series, St. Petersburg, Florida Councilmember Gina Driscoll said leading the way on single-use plastic started with "one simple object."
Planet Forward
The Nov. 5, 2021, panel discussed how Indigenous knowledge can guide sustainable food systems, and is now archived online.
Planet Forward
The Nov. 12 event focused on digital storytelling in climate justice and the future of the movement
A amber sand dune towers over the tiny figures of a group of people.

A towering sand dun in Wadi Rum(Farzona Comnas/George Washington University).

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | Jordan's deserts and rocky landscapes have been beloved by Hollywood and cinephiles for decades, yet the country has seen deadly flash floods. How are local environmentalists to respond?
A colorful sky warms up the landscape view of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China

A view of the Forbidden City from Jingshan Park in Beijing. (Daniel Mathis/Creative Commons 3.0)

George Washington University
Today is the final day of COP26. How should we reflect on the conference? What discussions remain to be tackled?
Several neutral toned skyscrapers sit under a blue sky on the edge of a body of water.

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York, New York (massmatt/Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/). 

George Washington University
Climate Hits Home | I’ll probably never know if climate change caused all that extra pollen that sent me to the emergency room that day, but the science is definitive. Warming temperatures usher in way more pollen.
A prototype wooden model of the architect's triangular structure, and features scaled down human figures, and boats. The sides of the building are open to allow the viewer to peer inside.

Nigerian-born architect Kunlé Adeyemi's NLÉ studio developed the Makoko Floating School as a prototype for building in areas prone to flooding. The triangular shape gives the structure stability on the water, with a low center of gravity. (B/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

George Washington University
On the second to last day of COP26, the official theme of the day is cities, regions, and built environments. But what is a built environment, and why is the link to climate change so important?

Food scraps are turned into methane and other gases that are captured and turned into fuel in UC Davis' Renewable Energy Anaerobic Biodigester. (KQED Quest/Flickr/Creative Commons 2.0)

George Washington University
There are only two days left at COP26, and while much progress has been made, there's still more to do. Today learn about how reducing methane could change our climate's course, and explore packaging challenges.

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