Our 2021-22 Planet Forward Correspondents

(Photo by Ljubomir Žarković/Unsplash).

We are pleased to announce our 2021-2022 team of Planet Forward Correspondents! More information will be shared soon about the exceptional team of students selected. Get to know them below:

  • Ryan Bieber – Ithaca College. Ryan is a Journalism major with minors in Environmental Studies and Spanish.
  • Greer Blount – George Washington University. Greer is a senior majoring in Communications with minors in Journalism and Dance.
  • Helen Bradshaw - Northwestern University. Helen is a junior studying Journalism, Art History, and Integrated Marketing Communications.
  • Kaitlyn Copland – Eckerd College. Kaitlyn is majoring in Marine Science and minoring in Film Studies.
  • Skylar Epstein – George Washington University. Skylar is a senior majoring in Political Science with minors in Journalism and History.
  • Hannah Frankel – Middlebury College. Hannah is a senior majoring in Literary Studies.
  • Lexi Hernandez – Chapman University. Lexi is majoring in Environmental Science & Policy as well as Sociology while minoring in Art History.
  • Lily John – SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Lily is a sophomore majoring in Environmental Studies.
  • Halley Hughes – University of Arizona. Halley is a junior studying Natural Resources and the Environment with focuses on Global Change Ecology and Urban and Regional Development.
  • Clarice Knelly – SUNY Plattsburgh. Clarice is a senior majoring English: Writing Arts and minoring in Environmental Science and Canadian Studies.
  • Kai Lepley – University of Arizona. Kai is a graduate student pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography.
  • Diana Quintero – Arizona State University. Diana is a senior majoring in Journalism and Mass Communications with a minor in Business.
  • Carter Weinhofer – Eckerd College. Carter is studying in Environmental Studies and Spanish.

2021-22 Senior Correspondents:

  • Evan Barnard – American University. Evan is a graduate student pursuing a masters in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
  • Ali Wilt – Northwestern University. Ali is a senior majoring in Journalism and minoring in Environmental Policy and Culture.

All Correspondent work will be featured here. Check back frequently!

How do you move the Planet Forward? Tweet us @planet_forward or contribute to the conversation with your own story.

Hub Content

A side by side of two forested mountains.

Left: Spain, 2021 (Ryan Bieber/Ithaca College) Right: California, 2019 (Andreas Haslinger/Unsplash)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Ithaca College
There are two huge mountain ranges, on two different continents, both of the same name. The similarities don’t end there either. Both are being increasingly affected by climate change.
Planet Forward Correspondent | University of Arizona
A multitude of unexpected benefits have sprouted after water was added to a river in Tucson, creating an explosion of desert biodiversity.
Woman in a black shirt smiles at the camera while holding out an iPhone and standing in front a large monitor showing a page titled "EpiCollect RoadkillGarneau" with a map of the continental U.S. and several charts.

Dr. Garneau presenting research on her RoadkillGarneau project back in 2012. (Gerianne Downs/SUNY-Plattsburgh)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
Dr. Danielle Garneau, wildlife ecologist, is an attentive driver. The serpentine roads of upstate New York, which she drives along daily, are trafficked with possible hazards –– but what she's really scouting for is roadkill. 
Asian elephant in an enclosure at the National Zoo.

An Asian elephant stands near the fence of its enclosure at the National Zoo in Washington DC. Asian elephants are the closest living relatives of wooly mammoths. Photo from 5/8/2019. (Skylar Epstein/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
One biotech startup claims it can use Asian elephants to breed “functional mammoths” that help fight climate change. The prospect of bringing genetic engineering technologies into the world of conservation raises complex moral questions.
A man with dark blonde hair in a pale green polo and green pants plays guitar while in a canoe in a narrow body of water surrounded by lush green trees and a cloudy blue sky.

From "Orange" Acoustic Music Video (Photo courtesy Pinegrove)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Ithaca College
Pinegrove's frontman walked me through his songwriting process and inspiration behind the album. He also gave insight on how he incorporates activism in his daily life and how he copes with the current state of climate change.
A person in a white shirt, head not pictured, holds a yellow water bottle with several colorful, overlapping stickers.

Paige Valego, GW class of 2021. (Greer Blount/George Washington University)

Planet Forward Correspondent | George Washington University
So Long, Single-Use? | As George Washington University students returned to campus in the fall of 2021, they took ownership of the university's single-use plastics ban through the personalization of reusable water bottles.
Planet Forward Correspondent | Arizona State University
According to N-Drip’s Chief Sustainability Officer, Seth Siegel, their technology brings a new irrigation system that could help save 50% of the water used in Arizona’s agriculture.
Two men in suits talk to one another in front a blue wall with green and white United nation Climate Change graphics.

"Prime Minister Boris Johnson and António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations at COP26 World Leaders Summit" (Karwai Tang/UK Government via Flickr)

Planet Forward Correspondent | Northwestern University
In conversation with PF Correspondent Helen Bradshaw, Washington Post climate reporter Tik Root analyzed what happened in the conference, or maybe more appropriately, what didn’t happen.
People circle around round, white tables on a green floor beneath an illuminate globe which represents the Earth.

"The action zone and globe at COP26 at the Hydro, Glasgow." (Alan Harvey/UK Government via Flickr)

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY Environmental Science and Forestry
In the aftermath of COP26, PF Correspondent Lily John sat down with social-ecological systems and ecological economics researcher Dr. Valerie Luzadis, who attended the summit virtually.
A green sign reads "Ruelle verte" or green alley over a wooden pagado.

The sign on the wooden arch reads "Ruelle verte" or "green alley." (Clarice Knelly/SUNY-Plattsburgh).

Planet Forward Correspondent | SUNY-Plattsburgh
William Borque said the alleyways that surrounded Rosemont-La Petite-Patrie's community garden in Montreal used to be a “wasteland.” Now, they’re brimming with fruit trees, mushroom gardens and local art.

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