The Galápagos: Stories of science & survival

The Planet Forward Storyfest 2019 winners traveled with Planet Forward and Lindblad Expeditions for an expedition to the legendary and unique ecosystems of the Galápagos Islands in August 2019, and reported on the unparalleled stories found there.

We had nine students join us — seven Storyfest winners and two students sponsored by their school. We are so proud of the diverse group of students who joined us on the trip this year. They were so focused on creating the best stories they could from this experience. We hope you will learn something from these stories, and that these pieces will enable you to step into these travelers' shoes — even for a moment — and feel as if you were aboard the Lindblad-National Geographic Endeavour II, and experiencing incredible encounters with wildlife, just as they did.

Galapagos 2019 travelers

Keep an eye on this page as the stories roll out. Scroll down to read all of our stories from the Galápagos!

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Hub Content

marine iguanas in the Galápagos

Marine iguanas bathing in the sun. (Vicki Deng/Reed College)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | Reed College
Next in our Galápagos series, Vicki Deng marvels at the opportunity Planet Forward storytellers had to stand where Darwin stood — and witness the inspiration to his revolutionary theory of evolution.

The Galapagos islands are home to many plants and animals, both terrestrial and aquatic, that are found nowhere else in the world. (Henry Becker/George Washington University)

George Washington University
Next in our Galápagos series, GW's Henry Becker discusses invasive species eradication programs — both the successes and their pitfalls — and explores the controversial topic of biological control.

Gianna Haro.

George Washington University
In the second story of our Galápagos series, Corinne Tarantino takes a look at why biologists study in the field. Come hear Gianna Haro's motivation to study biology, starting with her childhood in the Galápagos.
Celso Montalvo in the Galápagos

Celso Montalvo, who now works as a naturalist with Lindblad Expeditions, shared his experiences with the problematic goat population, growing up in the Galápagos. (Peter Jurich/University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Planet Forward Senior Correspondent | University of Wisconsin-Madison
In the first story of our series from our Storyfest 2019 expedition to the Galápagos, Peter Jurich examines an atypical invasive species: Goats. They were brought to the islands in the 1700s, and it took hundreds of years to eradicate them.