Reflections: Nature writing from the University of Georgia

Planet Forward is proud to host a series of nature writing articles created by students of the University of Georgia. Below is a note of thanks written by Professor Anandam Kavoori.

Check back here for new stories in this ongoing series!


Thank you for taking time to read these short nature writing reflections. They were written by students in an Environmental Communication class at the University of Georgia. Students wrote these reflections alongside reading essays on the concept of Biophilia. The late naturalist, Edward O. Wilson suggested that humans possess an innate urge to seek connections with nature and affiliate with other forms of life—Biophilia.

These reflections are also informed an understanding of the role of experience (sensorial) and Place based writing. Place refers to the idea that ecological, cultural and mediated understandings of the environment are primarily experienced through a Place—a sandbox, a favorite bench in a favorite park, a mountain, a beach. A focus on Place allows for an emotional connection to issues of conservation that an issue or theme-based approach to environmental communication typically does not. The places these reflections engage with are varied, including those near students homes (a backyard, a porch, ridge, a river) or in far flung locations—Utah, Copenhagen, the Okefenokee Swamp, Costa Rica, China, and Cloudland Canyon.
 

-Anandam Kavoori, Professor, Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication                                                                              

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Hub Content

The author stands a on surfboard while riding a wave.

Riding a wave at Pavones, Costa Rica. (Photos courtesy of Alyssa Milstead unless otherwise noted)

University of Georgia
Surf’s up! Learning to fall flat, get up, and keep going while abroad in Costa Rica.

The ridge on my parent's property in Georgia where my sister and I went on many adventures. (Kate Monday)

University of Georgia
To climb Mount Everest: In your backyard at the age of six!
A small wooden bridge and pathway are lined by green trees in Cornelia City Park, Georgia.

One of my favorite places to go in Cornelia, Georgia. This photo was taken in Summer, 2022 on a warm Sunday afternoon. (Hannah Woodward)

University of Georgia
If your dog poops in the park and nobody sees it, did your dog really poop in the park? Mother nature is always watching.
A row of colorful houses along a picturesque canal in Denmark. Sailboats are docked along the canal edge.

(Jorge Franganillo/flickr)

University of Georgia
In cold Copenhagen: The sun came out and so did we!
Rain falls onto a pond in a Georgia backyard. The pond is encircled with garden plants and filled with lily pads.

Rain pitter patters in my grandmother's pond. (Emily Harris)

University of Georgia
Napping in Grandmother's garden. Connecting to nature. Join me.
Looking down at Beachwood Canyon from a wooded hill.

Above Beachwood Canyon, Los Angeles. (Nevaeh Brown)

University of Georgia
What lies behind the Hollywood sign? A different kind of glamorous. Join me to discover.
A group of young people climb a tree in the forest.

A summer day in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Georgia. (Rebecca Emerson)

University of Georgia
Stuck on a mountain. During the pandemic. Don't worry, it all turned out ok. It's a good story too. Read on.

Shady Creek River during sunset with haze over the water in July 2021. (Shannon Lorusso)

University of Georgia
Messing around in nature at the Shady Creek River, Georgia. Slumbering in an Eno hammock, saving a life, and more…
A small blonde dong sniffs a flower in the garden.

(Kassidy Usry)

University of Georgia
In Grandma’s garden. Hot tea, flowers, and squirrels. Cardinals and cats too. Come visit with me.
A view of the canyon partially obscured by trees.

One of the best views of Cloudland Canyon. (Photos by Nicolas Samuel Horne/University of Georgia)

University of Georgia
Leaving ungodly early. Arriving at Cloudland Canyon. Walking it openly. Join me for an adventure.

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